Light Art To Business Cards: January's Most Talked About Art Exhibitions

Tabish Khan
By Tabish Khan Last edited 28 months ago
Light Art To Business Cards: January's Most Talked About Art Exhibitions

The 2016 art calendar has now kicked off, but what's the verdict on these new exhibitions? We’ve picked a mixture of ones that are grabbing the headlines and others we think are worth a look. Most are free to visit.

Image courtesy Bloomberg Space

Tim Etchells: More Noise at Bloomberg Space
Are you missing Lumiere and Winter Lights, or did you miss out on it altogether? Well there's still a slice of light art to be found in this three piece humorous exhibition. Until 12 March, free.

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

Heman Chong at South London Gallery
The floor of this large gallery is covered with a million blacked out business cards. Visitors are encouraged to navigate this slippery surface that plays with convention. There's even a sign about not going beyond a certain point that we're allowed to gleefully ignore. Until 28 February, free.

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

Rosangela Renno at The Photographers' Gallery
Audience activated projectors produce images of social and political upheaval in Uruguay and Latin America in the 1960s and 70s. It's all accompanied by a chilling music box rendition of The Internationale — a Communist anthem. Until 3 April, £3 or free before midday.

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

Image courtesy Beers London

Benjamin Murphy: Gilded Chaos at Beers London
The gallery is transformed as the walls are covered with Murphy's black and white illustrative style. Murphy's work could almost be classified as street art, a welcome departure for this gallery. Until 13 February, free.

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

Chantal Joffe at Victoria Miro, Mayfair
The acclaimed portrait painter returns with new works. We've never warmed to her works and though there are a few here that offer some psychological insight into her subjects, we remain unconvinced by the unimaginative others. Until 24 March, free.

Londonist Rating:

★★☆☆☆

Giacomo Manzu at Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art
Another exhibition of what the Estorick does best, highlighting the skill of an Italian artist who isn't well known over here. The sculptures are fantastic, and the sweeping lines of the gilded seated cardinal makes for a spectacular work. Until 3 April, £5.

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

© The Trustees of the British Museum

Light, time, legacy: Francis Towne at The British Museum
These landscapes all come across as flat and lifeless. It's one of the downsides of watercolours when compared to oils and Towne is never able to overcome these drawbacks. They are technically very proficient but offer nothing more than scenes that are nice to look at. Until 14 August, free.

Londonist Rating:

★★☆☆☆

Krishna in the Garden of Assam at The British Museum
Next door to Towne is a radically different exhibition. The life of Krishna is told through a massive devotional textile. The story is fleshed out through a video and ceremonials masks, including an impressive one of a five headed serpent. Until 15 August, free.

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

Julian Charriere at Parasol Unit
The issue of man clashing with the environment is captured in imaginative ways. Photographs show a man melting an iceberg with a blowtorch; the gallery contains 'bricks' that are used to extract Lithium for batteries; and globes are sanded down so that boundaries no longer exist. Until 23 March, free.

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

I am Van Dyck at Dulwich Picture Gallery
Some excellent portraiture from the Old Master, including the excellent self-portrait on loan from the National Portrait Gallery. There is a contemporary response from Mark Wallinger but this feels unimpressive and gimmicky. Until 24 April, £5.

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

Last Updated 25 January 2016

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