Walkie Talkie Building Rapidly Growing In City

M@
By M@ Last edited 74 months ago
Walkie Talkie Building Rapidly Growing In City
The building with more up top.
The building with more up top.
Core blimey.
Core blimey.
A new presence on the City skyline.
A new presence on the City skyline.
The Walkie Talkie in all its dubious glory.
The Walkie Talkie in all its dubious glory.
walkietalkie2.jpg
An artist's impression of the sky garden.
An artist's impression of the sky garden.

One of London's most controversial new buildings is climbing into the City sky at an exceptional rate. 20 Fenchurch Street, commonly known as the 'walkie talkie' thanks to its top-heavy profile, had barely troubled pavement level this time last month. Now it's reached the 13th floor (already one higher than when these photos were taken on Friday).

The structure, designed by Rafael Vinoly, will eventually thrust (albeit bluntly) 160 metres into the air, making it about the same height as the Broadgate Tower at the other end of the City. Its shape divides opinion. Some fear that the bulbous upper portion and the building's relative closeness to the river will harmfully intrude upon the skyline. Others look forward to the public sky garden, which will grace the upper floors (see images).

With its core already one-third complete, 20 Fenchurch Street should approach its final height in spring next year. The steel and glass superstructure will take a while to catch up, however. We'll have to live with a chunky concrete core on the skyline for some time.

Follow the building's progress on SkyscraperCity forums.

Last Updated 19 December 2011

Aquatulip

Well, the planning officers in central London seem to be exceptionally broad-minded compared to the rest of the city.  So if buildings such as Lloyd's and The Gherkin get through the process, why not this Walkie Talkie?  There aren't many residents to object to architects' plans in these commercial areas, so it seems anything goes.  I think the "sky garden" looks good; any chance of something biological rather than concrete or metal must be of benefit in this densely built-up area.