William Hogarth's London

M@
By M@ Last edited 26 months ago
William Hogarth's London
Hogarth contributed these marvellous wall paintings to the staircase at St Bart's Great Hall. The murals can be seen from the hospital's museum, which is worth a visit in its own right.
Hogarth contributed these marvellous wall paintings to the staircase at St Bart's Great Hall. The murals can be seen from the hospital's museum, which is worth a visit in its own right.
Inside St Bartholomew-the-Great church in Smithfield you'll find one of London's oldest fonts. The infant Hogarth was baptised in this very bowl back in 1697.
Inside St Bartholomew-the-Great church in Smithfield you'll find one of London's oldest fonts. The infant Hogarth was baptised in this very bowl back in 1697.
Hogarth lived, for part of his life, in Leicester Square, where a bust could be found until renovations in 2012. We recently tracked down this old memorial stone, now stored in a warehouse in west London.
Hogarth lived, for part of his life, in Leicester Square, where a bust could be found until renovations in 2012. We recently tracked down this old memorial stone, now stored in a warehouse in west London.
Hogarth's House, one of London's many fine house museums. You can visit for free.
Hogarth's House, one of London's many fine house museums. You can visit for free.
Amsterdam named an elegant square after Rembrandt. Poor old Hogarth gets this busy road intersection beside his erstwhile country retreat. The Hogarth Roundabout is famous for this meek flyover, intended as a temporary feature when it was built in the 1970s.
Amsterdam named an elegant square after Rembrandt. Poor old Hogarth gets this busy road intersection beside his erstwhile country retreat. The Hogarth Roundabout is famous for this meek flyover, intended as a temporary feature when it was built in the 1970s.
This rather nifty statue of the great man stands on Chiswick High Road. Includes a likeness of his pug dog, Trump.
This rather nifty statue of the great man stands on Chiswick High Road. Includes a likeness of his pug dog, Trump.
Hogarth Road in Earl's Court. We don't know if there's a specific connection to WH, but we think he'd have approved of the upside-down trolley.
Hogarth Road in Earl's Court. We don't know if there's a specific connection to WH, but we think he'd have approved of the upside-down trolley.
A Rake's Progress is among Hogarth's most famous works. This piece, and its companion paintings, can be seen at Sir John Soane's Museum in Holborn.
A Rake's Progress is among Hogarth's most famous works. This piece, and its companion paintings, can be seen at Sir John Soane's Museum in Holborn.

While Turner's grabbing all the headlines at the moment thanks to a certain film, another of London's greatest artists deserves some love. William Hogarth died 250 years ago today (26 October). The artist is perhaps most famous for his satirical sequences, such as A Rake's Progress, but he was also a noted portraitist and painter of biblical scenes.

Works by Hogarth can be viewed in several of London's galleries and museums, including Tate Britain, the National Gallery, John Soane's Museum and the Foundling Museum, of which he was a leading patron and governor. Many other sites across town are associated with the artist. We've mapped them below and include photographs in the gallery above. Happy Hogarth hunting.

Last Updated 15 August 2016