Disruption At London Bridge Station: What's Happening?

M@
By M@ Last edited 49 months ago
Disruption At London Bridge Station: What's Happening?
The new-look platform 13.
The new-look platform 13.
The work from above, showing the mix of finished platforms, closed platforms and running platforms. For the geeks among you, the grey site offices (dead centre, beyond the platforms) are in the same building that which served the King's Cross Network Rail project until recently.
The work from above, showing the mix of finished platforms, closed platforms and running platforms. For the geeks among you, the grey site offices (dead centre, beyond the platforms) are in the same building that which served the King's Cross Network Rail project until recently.
The jumble of architecture and make-do infrastructure shows just why the rebuild is necessary.
The jumble of architecture and make-do infrastructure shows just why the rebuild is necessary.
Ultra-nerdy fact: the new London Bridge station is thought to be the only station in Britain in which the canopies extend to the very ends of the platforms.
Ultra-nerdy fact: the new London Bridge station is thought to be the only station in Britain in which the canopies extend to the very ends of the platforms.
Looking up through the new roof of platforms 12-13.
Looking up through the new roof of platforms 12-13.
The platform canopies incorporate a curvy architectural feature known as eyelids.
The platform canopies incorporate a curvy architectural feature known as eyelids.
Down beneath the platforms, a huge new concourse is taking shape. This pile of mud will be long gone when passengers gain access in mid-2016.
Down beneath the platforms, a huge new concourse is taking shape. This pile of mud will be long gone when passengers gain access in mid-2016.
Old rail arches can be seen in the new concourse area.
Old rail arches can be seen in the new concourse area.
Geothermal energy will be used to heat parts of the station. Here's the infrastructure, waiting to be hooked up.
Geothermal energy will be used to heat parts of the station. Here's the infrastructure, waiting to be hooked up.
Down in the vaults beneath the platform. This section will become a service area.
Down in the vaults beneath the platform. This section will become a service area.
Different generations of construction can be seen beneath the platforms. Original brickwork and a later Victorian addition contrast with modern breeze blocks.
Different generations of construction can be seen beneath the platforms. Original brickwork and a later Victorian addition contrast with modern breeze blocks.
A typical recess beneath the platforms.
A typical recess beneath the platforms.

Commuters through London Bridge station face nine days of disruption from this weekend, as First Capital Connect and Southern services are diverted elsewhere.

This will not be fun. It is, however, necessary. London Bridge is the oldest major station in the capital and handles 54 million passengers a year, while platform 6 is reckoned to be the busiest in Europe, with 18 trains per hour. So the station is long overdue an upgrade. The Thameslink Programme, which has already seen, among other achievements, the complete overhaul of Blackfriars station, is finally kitting out London Bridge for the 21st century.

Work is currently underway to rebuild all the platforms and create a spacious new concourse among the ancient arches beneath. When finished in mid-2016, this concourse will cover an area greater than Wembley's pitch. It will also introduce a new north-south axis into the station, making it easier to move between the thriving Bermondsey Street area and the Thames. Many of the Victorian arches supporting the platforms will also be revealed.

New platforms 14 and 15 opened in March 2014. The engineering works taking place between 23 and 31 August will complete the reconstruction of platforms 12 and 13, which will open at the start of September. Platforms 10 and 11 will then close for rebuilding, as work progresses north, two platforms at a time. Eventually, all platforms at London Bridge will be fully integrated to the same concourse for the first time.

The project will be completed in 2018, a little before the opening of Crossrail. Click through the gallery above for more details about the changes.

Last Updated 20 August 2014