The Famous Residents Of Chinatown

M@
By M@ Last edited 97 months ago
The Famous Residents Of Chinatown
Edmund Burke, the political thinker, member of parliament, and a founder of modern conservatism lived at number 37 from 1787 to 1790.
Edmund Burke, the political thinker, member of parliament, and a founder of modern conservatism lived at number 37 from 1787 to 1790.
The famous poet John Dryden had rooms at number 43, dying here in 1700.
The famous poet John Dryden had rooms at number 43, dying here in 1700.
Sir Joshua Reynolds and Dr Johnson are two Londoners who hopefully need no introduction. Together, they founded The Literary Club (a general talking shop for anything except politics) at the Turk's Head Tavern, here at number 9. Reynolds lived round the corner, on the site of the old Swiss Centre.
Sir Joshua Reynolds and Dr Johnson are two Londoners who hopefully need no introduction. Together, they founded The Literary Club (a general talking shop for anything except politics) at the Turk's Head Tavern, here at number 9. Reynolds lived round the corner, on the site of the old Swiss Centre.
Paul de Lamerie was one of the most celebrated silversmiths of the Georgian era. His rooms were at number 40.
Paul de Lamerie was one of the most celebrated silversmiths of the Georgian era. His rooms were at number 40.
16858_gerrardstreetmain.jpg
Number 39 sports a plaque to the Penny Post. This building was the first to operate as a public post office in Westminster. http://www2.westminster.gov.uk/press-releases/2008-05/green-plaque-added-to-chinatown-s-heritage/
Number 39 sports a plaque to the Penny Post. This building was the first to operate as a public post office in Westminster. http://www2.westminster.gov.uk/press-releases/2008-05/green-plaque-added-to-chinatown-s-heritage/

If we had a nickel for every blog post (even books) urging us to look up above eye level in London, we'd have...well, whatever a nickel is worth, times about a thousand. But all clich├ęs have some truth to them. One place where it's easy to forget to raise the gaze is Gerrard Street. The constant thong throng of visitors, from seekers of exotic ingredients to noodley clumps of tourists don't make it easy. However, we managed to find a rainy spring day when the footfall was light enough to allow leisurely exploration. The heart of Chinatown has a rich history, played out in a series of plaques along the street. Click through the gallery above to learn more about some illustrious former residents and patrons of Gerrard Street.

Last Updated 05 April 2010