Aperol Spritz And The Milky Way Feature In This Stunning Exhibition Of Science Photos

Aperol Spritz And The Milky Way Feature In This Stunning Exhibition Of Science Photos
Soap bubble structures © Kym Cox

The first ever Science Photographer of the Year exhibition comes to Science Museum this autumn, showcasing striking shots of the tiny details of science.

Calmness of Eternity © Yevhen Samuchenko

Held by the Royal Photographic Society, the exhibition combines science and art in a series of shortlisted photos, covering topics from space to the human body — and the crystallisation of Aperol (of Aperol spritz fame).

The Science of (Every) Day Life © Bernardo Cesare

Bernardo Cesare's psychedelic image, The Science of (Every) Day Life, shows the sugar crystallisation of a drop of Aperol that has been left to dry on a glass slide, and we'll be honest, it's far less orange than we expected.

Tribolium confusum. Confused flour beetle. © David Spears
Other everyday materials shown in the photos include the structure of soap bubbles and the formations of face cream.
Safety Corona © Richard Germain

Large scale images include a shot of the Milky Way, taken from the Himalayas in Nepal, and the 3,200 tonne Lovell Telescope in Cheshire.

Lovell Telescope Series 1C © Marge Bradshaw

Various photographic equipment including smartphones, digital telescopes and medical imaging equipment were used to capture the pictures.

Stag beetle © Viktor Sýkora

Roger Highfield, Science Director at the Science Museum and competition judge, said:

Since its inception, photography has bridged the worlds of art and science with images which spark and sate curiosity in equal measure. Through images of aesthetic beauty, we can tell stories about the universe and reveal places and phenomena that the naked eye will never see.

Super Moon Lunar Eclipse January 2019 © Mary Anne Chilton

The winners will be announced to coincide with the launch of the exhibition in October.

North American Nebula © Dave Watson

Science Photographer of the Year is on display at Science Museum, 7 October 2019-5 January 2020. Entry is free but tickets need to be booked in advance.

© Yasmin Crawford

Last Updated 15 August 2019