Stalinism And Giant Teeth: London's Most Talked-About Art Exhibitions

Tabish Khan
By Tabish Khan Last edited 22 months ago
Stalinism And Giant Teeth: London's Most Talked-About Art Exhibitions
This taxidermied horse by Maurizio Cattelan looks like it's punched through the wall.

Melodrama Act I at Luxembourg & Dayan
It will be hard for any visitor to prise their eyes away from this cheeky Maurizio Cattelan sculpture of a headless horse suspended from the wall. But look at the opposite wall and only a tail is visible of a large fish. It's great that the main gallery space is dedicated to these two works with little to distract from this playful duo. Until 20 August, free.
Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

Painter's Paintings: From Freud to Van Dyck at The National Gallery
What paintings do other painters own? What a great premise for an exhibition as we learn about the works Lucien Freud and Henri Matisse had in their own collections. Unfortunately the works can't live up to the concept, and the links between the works they owned and the works they produced is often tenuous. Until 4 September, £10 adults.

Londonist Rating:

★★☆☆☆

Nairy Baghramian: Scruff of the neck at Marian Goodman
Sculptures of giant teeth supported by metal armatures. They may be massive but they have nothing to bite into so they are both imposing and impotent. Until 29 July, free.

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

We love these tree shoes in Peckham. Image courtesy Bosse & Baum
Artificial Arcadia at Bosse & Baum
This Peckham gallery my be a tricky one to locate but the art it has on show is worth the trek. The highlight of this immersive installation are the trees that appear to grow out of shoes like a pair of legs. It draws attention to how plants are more mobile than we think, but it's also a fun set of works. Until 31 July, free.

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

Wolfgang Tillmans at Maureen Paley
A particularly prescient exhibition as the artists's pro-European sentiments are expressed through everything from open water to printer paper — as it's pretty much the same in every country. There are some great concepts here but the works themselves lack punch. Until 31 July, free.

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

Winifred Knights at Dulwich Picture gallery
A long forgotten painter is given her time to shine in this exhibition. Knights is a talented painter who drew inspiration from the early Renaissance with biblical scenes aplenty, unfortunately she wasn't able to build on this foundation to create something truly unique. Was she cruelly overlooked? Yes. Is she something special? No. Until 18 September, £12.50 adults.

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

The show may be terrible, but at least it has pretty chairs — but you can't sit on them,
Mary Heilmann: Looking at Pictures at Whitechapel gallery
Bright bold colours in abstract painting has its part in art history. But Heilmann came to this game well after Malevich and Mondrian, and she has nothing new to offer here. The brightly coloured chairs are pretty though. Until 21 August, free.

Londonist Rating:

★☆☆☆☆

Superwoman: Work, Build and Don't Whine at Gallery for Russian Art and Design
A truly fascinating exhibition exploring the role of women both during and after Stalin's reign. Motherhood was venerated as the means to producing the next generation of workers, and Socialism was conveyed as more empowering to women than Capitalism where women were simply housewives. Figurines, art and chocolate bars all feature offering some historical insight into that era. Until 17 September, free

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

Who doesn't love a bit of light art? Keith Sonnier definitely thinks so.
Mesmerising sculptures of neon occupy this one room display. They are great to sit with and stare at. They may not offer much more than visual pleasure, but they still held our gaze. Until 11 September, free.

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

Making & Unmaking at Camden Arts Centre
A group show curated by a fashion designer results in a colourful mix of textiles, paintings and the playful sculptures of Yinka Shonibare. The install really helps bring the varying works together and it's more engaging than the past few exhibitions we've seen at this gallery. Until 18 September, free.

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

Engineering the World: Ove Arup and the philosophy of Total Design at V&A
This exhibition charting the life of Ove Arup and Arup, the engineering firm he founded, starts promisingly. The install is visually arresting with scaffolding transforming the Porter gallery and micro-algae in a glowing green bioreactive facade near the entrance. But then we get bogged down with dull drawings and designs. We thought that the firm involved in the design of Crossrail, the Sydney Opera House and the Centre Pompidou would have some fascinating insights but the exhibits on display are surprisingly dull. Until 16 November, £7 adults.

Londonist Rating:

★★☆☆☆

Last Updated 23 June 2016