Fukushima To Tie Dye: London's Most Talked About Exhibitions

Tabish Khan
By Tabish Khan Last edited 22 months ago
Fukushima To Tie Dye: London's Most Talked About Exhibitions

What's the verdict on these new exhibitions? We’ve picked a mixture of ones that are grabbing the headlines and others we think are worth a look. All but one are free to visit.

War Horse features prominently in Curtain Up. (c) Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Curtain Up at V&A
A great chance to see some highlights from the V&A's theatre collection, in celebration of 40 years of the Olivier Awards. There are costumes and props from The Lion King and War Horse, as well as old programmes, posters and set designs.  If you're a theatrephile, but you haven't got the cash for a West End ticket this month, get your greasepaint fix here instead. Until 31 August, free

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

The Art of War at Hackney Museum
Propaganda posters asking young men to enlist. Plus medals, letters and a flag for the Stoke Newington national reserve. All this is built upon by artist in residence Lucy Harrison who has created contemporary posters on war. A treasure trove of an archive exhibition. Until 28 April, free

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

Franciszka & Stefan Themerson at Camden Arts Centre
An academic exhibition looking at a pair of experimental film-makers in pre-war Poland. A combination of abstract video, photography and literature offer some insight into their work. As the description alludes to, this is a very difficult show to penetrate and will undoubtedly alienate most visitors. Until 5 June, free

Londonist Rating:

★☆☆☆☆

A still from the winning video on Fukushima. Courtesy Karen Kramer & Jerwood / FVU

Jerwood / FVU Awards at Jerwood Space
A double header of big issues in these two films. An abandoned Fukushima provides a haunting backdrop for one and the second video takes us through the development of Battersea, narrated at breakneck speed. Both could have been more tightly edited but they are effective films and a massive improvement on last year's mediocre entries. Until 24 April, free

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

Eva Grubinger at Bloomberg Space
Brainteasers have been scaled up to a massive size. So big they couldn't be manipulated by hand easily, so they truly become mental puzzles to be solved without touching them. We were staring at them for an age trying to figure them out. Until 28 May, free

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

David Shrigley at Stephen Friedman
The hastily sketched drawings show off Shrigley's trademark humour. This time he riffs on op art, making fun of it with very simple interpretations. Not as strong as his Hayward Gallery exhibition but still a lot of fun. Until 20 April, free

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

One of Willem Weismann's subtle black paintings. Copyright the artist and Cabin gallery

Willem Weismann at Cabin
This Southfields gallery is quickly making a name for itself with emerging artists. The latest show is one of its strongest yet with the black paintings by Willem Weismann. These subtle post-apocalyptic visions of burned books and burnt out cars draw you in for a closer look. Until 16 April, free

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

Jac Leirner: Junkie at White Cube, Mason's Yard
Navigate the wires, threaded with cigarette and joint remnants, by ducking under them. It's novel to have our movement restricted by items we often see discarded on the street and ignore. However, the works downstairs are far less interesting. Until 14 May, free

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

On Their Own: Britain's Child Migrants @ The Museum of Childhood
Child migration in Britain didn't stop until 1970. Children were sent abroad by government and charities in hopes they would have a better life. Some of the heartbreaking stories are charted here, including the harsh treatment these children faced in their new adopted home. It's a particularly prescient issue given the news around migrants today. Until 12 June, free

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

Marian Clayden at Fashion & Textile Museum
The queen of tie dye shows up our school efforts. Ranging from hippy days right through to modern interpretations, showing us that tie-dye can be chic as well. Until 17 April, £9/£7.70

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

Last Updated 04 April 2016