Sinatra Resurrected At The London Palladium

By Sam Smith Last edited 31 months ago
Sinatra Resurrected At The London Palladium

There has been many a show about Ol' Blue Eyes before, but most have in one way or another introduced singers to play his part. Sinatra — The Man & His Music goes one step further by having him appear and sing his own classic songs through the use of film and recordings.

With Sinatra resurrected to such a degree, and supported by dancers and a live band, the experience feels a little like a shrine containing a relic.

The important object lies at centre while everything surrounding it is designed to contribute to our feelings of reverence. In this way, Sinatra's voice alone might be classed as the essence of the show, while the film becomes an embellishment just as much as the musicians and dancers.

There is no doubt that the evening is slick, with the 20 dancers and 24-strong band, conducted by Richard John, proving highly accomplished.

The video designs, courtesy of 59 Productions, make Frank feel truly three-dimensional as they frequently turn black and white film into colour, create backdrops that ensure he stands out even more, and sometimes make it seem as if he is walking across the stage.

His own words from interviews are also broadcast with the subsequent songs tying in with the sentiments he has just expressed. In fact, as we watch Sinatra before us, we often forget that he would not actually be aware he was singing on the stage of the London Palladium (where he first performed in 1950) surrounded by numerous dancers.

The different numbers place varying degrees of emphasis upon Sinatra's voice, the band and the dancing, but still the evening does not offer that much more than one classic song after another. Thus, while this enjoyable show delivers well on what it does do, it could only be classed as a 'must-see' for die-hard Frank Sinatra fans.

Until 10 October at the London Palladium, Argyll Street, London W1F 7TF. For tickets (£14.50-£59.50) visit the Sinatra — The Man & His Music website. Londonist saw this show on a complimentary ticket.

Last Updated 22 July 2015

Christopher Fowler

I saw Sinatra live at Caesar's Palace, and the idea of seeing this would be like watching footage in a morgue. For the record, his between-songs patter was bad-tempered and ungracious - but his vocal intonation was sublime.