PM To Consider Banning Rush Hour Lorries After Cyclist Death

Andy Thornley
By Andy Thornley Last edited 31 months ago
PM To Consider Banning Rush Hour Lorries After Cyclist Death

Image by nolionsinengland in the Londonist Flickr Pool

The Prime Minister, David Cameron, has told an influential group of MPs that he will look in to the possibility of banning lorries from city centres during rush hour after the death of a young lady on Threadneedle Street in the City of London.

Ying Tao was hit by a left-turning lorry outside Bank — a junction which sees the interchange of seven roads. She was the eighth person to be killed on a bike in the capital – seven of these accidents involved a heavy goods vehicle (HGV).

Cameron attended the All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group after Exeter MP and former Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, Ben Bradshaw, raised Miss Tao’s death at Prime Minister’s Questions.

https://twitter.com/BenPBradshaw/status/621291078176649216

As well as agreeing to look at the ban on HGVs during busy periods, the Prime Minister also told the group he would ask the Transport Secretary to look further at ways accidents could be avoided including improvements to roads and junctions, changing traffic light phasing, the design of construction vehicles and improved enforcement of mandatory lorry safety features.

After the meeting, which took place on Wednesday night, Ben Bradshaw said: “Our major cities have a lamentable record both for levels of cycling and for cycle safety compared to those of our European neighbours, and it would take very little public investment to make a big improvement in the climate for cycling.

“Following our meeting today, we will be meeting with the Transport Secretary to discuss the issues in more detail.”

Last Updated 17 July 2015

MattFromLondonist

Sounds positive in principle. Be interesting to hear how this might affect, for example, the construction industry. When building concrete cores or rafts, I think I'm right in saying that the concrete must be poured continuously for hours, with multiple mixers arriving at site. You can't pause and restart. Would such pours have to switch to night time, when noise levels might be unacceptable?