See Towering Sand Dunes And Lakes So Salty They Don't Freeze

Tabish Khan
By Tabish Khan Last edited 34 months ago
See Towering Sand Dunes And Lakes So Salty They Don't Freeze ★★★★☆ 4
The Chilean city of Iquique is bordered on one side by the ocean and the other by a massive sand dune known as Dragon's Hill. Copyright Alexander Lindsay
The Chilean city of Iquique is bordered on one side by the ocean and the other by a massive sand dune known as Dragon's Hill. Copyright Alexander Lindsay
This forest of dead trees feels foreboding. Copyright Alexander Lindsay
This forest of dead trees feels foreboding. Copyright Alexander Lindsay
A lone sentinel overlooking a snowy plain. According to local legends, this is where God carved his first model for man. Copyright Alexander Lindsay
A lone sentinel overlooking a snowy plain. According to local legends, this is where God carved his first model for man. Copyright Alexander Lindsay
A glacier proceeds on its slow journey down the mountain to the water. Copyright Alexander Lindsay
A glacier proceeds on its slow journey down the mountain to the water. Copyright Alexander Lindsay
The texture of this cave and the water are in sync, so it's hard to distinguish between the two. Copyright Alexander Lindsay
The texture of this cave and the water are in sync, so it's hard to distinguish between the two. Copyright Alexander Lindsay
The winds have eroded the side of this mountain, hence the way it reflects the light and takes on a greenish hue. Copyright Alexander Lindsay
The winds have eroded the side of this mountain, hence the way it reflects the light and takes on a greenish hue. Copyright Alexander Lindsay

Londonist Rating: ★★★★☆

Puna is the Incan name for a plateau high up in the Andes mountain range. It's a place that experiences weather extremes of heat, cold, wind and even greater solar radiation due to its altitude. These desolate conditions, however, make for great photography and Alexander Lindsay has captured some truly breathtaking landscapes covering everything from deserts to glaciers.

These images don't do the works justice as some of the photographs on display are enormous and the detail within them is superb. Getting up close to a massive landscape it's possible to discern those distant pink and white blobs to be a flamingos in a far away lake.

There's a lot of variety in Lindsay's portfolio, covering lakes so salty they don't freeze, mountains formed from lava that are so new that the weather hasn't had a chance to erode them yet and gnarled and bleached driftwood by the ocean's shore.

The presence of people features too in the city of Iquique, but it is dwarfed by the giant sand dune called Dragon's Hill, which towers over the buildings. These photographs wouldn't work on a smaller scale and so it's fitting they aren't restricted to a standard gallery and can take advantage of this massive atrial space over two floors.

These are majestic photographs and standing before them makes the viewer feel small and inconsequential in front of these natural wonders.

Alexander Lindsay: Altitude is on at Piano Nobile King's Place, 90 York Way, N1 9AG until 20 June. Admission is free and the exhibition is on Monday to Sunday, 9am-8pm.

For more great photography exhibitions see the latest nominees for the Deutsche Börse photography prize and another excellent edition of Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

Last Updated 18 April 2015

Glenshane Pass

> ...and even radiation due to its proximity to the sun ...
I don't think so! The increase in solar radiation is due to the reduced air mass that the sunlight passes through on its way to earth at higher altitudes. This is also the reason why it's hotter at the equator than the poles, and why summer is hotter than winter. Nothing to do with distance from the sun.