Share Your Journey And Be Part Of Jewish Museum's Exhibition

By Sponsor Last edited 35 months ago
Share Your Journey And Be Part Of Jewish Museum's Exhibition

This is a sponsored article on behalf of Jewish Museum London.

"My daughter, Grace, now 22, wore these when she was 4 as flower girl at the church wedding of friends.  I come across these every so often and think I should get rid of them, but never do.  They remind me of how that day I saw her with deepened understanding.  She found it very uncomfortable to stand for any length of time so she unobtrusively looked around, found a suitable spot, and sank to the floor to watch proceedings from there.  Such a little gesture that told of her clarity of judgment and mature good sense.  So I keep the shoes."  (Jane Petkovic)
"My daughter, Grace, now 22, wore these when she was 4 as flower girl at the church wedding of friends. I come across these every so often and think I should get rid of them, but never do. They remind me of how that day I saw her with deepened understanding. She found it very uncomfortable to stand for any length of time so she unobtrusively looked around, found a suitable spot, and sank to the floor to watch proceedings from there. Such a little gesture that told of her clarity of judgment and mature good sense. So I keep the shoes." (Jane Petkovic)
"Met my husband and best friend by placing an advertisement and voicemail for $18 at a Jewish Community Center (West Hartford, Connecticut, USA) in-house publication called "Centerline" in 1993.  We will be married for 20 wonderful years in February."    (Ronna Sauerhoff) 
"Met my husband and best friend by placing an advertisement and voicemail for $18 at a Jewish Community Center (West Hartford, Connecticut, USA) in-house publication called "Centerline" in 1993.  We will be married for 20 wonderful years in February." (Ronna Sauerhoff) 
"This is a bust I made of my grandfather, modelled from life just a few weeks before he passed away.  I started the sculpture as merely an exercise in portraiture, but it wasn't until after I had finished that I realised what a precious object I was creating, laden with love and memory, and how grateful I am for time spent with him during its creation.  It made me very aware of the great responsibility you undertake when crafting a likeness of a person, which can become a vessel for emotion and memory, and holds a distinct notion of permanence/impermanence."   (Benedict Romain)
"This is a bust I made of my grandfather, modelled from life just a few weeks before he passed away. I started the sculpture as merely an exercise in portraiture, but it wasn't until after I had finished that I realised what a precious object I was creating, laden with love and memory, and how grateful I am for time spent with him during its creation. It made me very aware of the great responsibility you undertake when crafting a likeness of a person, which can become a vessel for emotion and memory, and holds a distinct notion of permanence/impermanence." (Benedict Romain)
"The box of errors is an object born of devotion and love contains many of the mistakes I've made over several years working as a sofer, a scribe.   It contains quills with which prayers, poems and amulets have been written, as well as the names of God and the names of many betrothed couples.  The box also contains all the tools I need as a sofer. including both cut and uncut quills, ruler, scribe's awl, rose thorn, jeweler's loupe, ink, ink-thinner, armenian bole, various grades of sandpaper, different shaped knife blades for carving the quills, razor blades for lifting letters off the page, and a small silver yad.  Whether a scribe is religious or not, he or she must practice their craft with love and devotion and words written this way are difficult to discard, even if they contain errors."  (Josh Baum)
"The box of errors is an object born of devotion and love contains many of the mistakes I've made over several years working as a sofer, a scribe. It contains quills with which prayers, poems and amulets have been written, as well as the names of God and the names of many betrothed couples. The box also contains all the tools I need as a sofer. including both cut and uncut quills, ruler, scribe's awl, rose thorn, jeweler's loupe, ink, ink-thinner, armenian bole, various grades of sandpaper, different shaped knife blades for carving the quills, razor blades for lifting letters off the page, and a small silver yad. Whether a scribe is religious or not, he or she must practice their craft with love and devotion and words written this way are difficult to discard, even if they contain errors." (Josh Baum)
"Seven years ago, my mother received this pin from a representative of the Scottish government at an India-UK leadership exchange program.  She gave it to me, and it stayed pinned on to my middle school pencil case for years.  At the time it meant nothing; it was just cute.  Now, I am a naïve second year at university who thinks she may have found the love of her life.  I’m Indian.   He’s Scottish.  So often, love is about serendipity.  This pin sits on my notice board as a reminder of how well fortune foretokens."   (Megha Harish)
"Seven years ago, my mother received this pin from a representative of the Scottish government at an India-UK leadership exchange program. She gave it to me, and it stayed pinned on to my middle school pencil case for years. At the time it meant nothing; it was just cute. Now, I am a naïve second year at university who thinks she may have found the love of her life. I’m Indian. He’s Scottish. So often, love is about serendipity. This pin sits on my notice board as a reminder of how well fortune foretokens." (Megha Harish)
"For me this puzzle represents the love between generations.  It belonged to my mum and her sisters and was always at my gran's house when we went to visit.  My own children have played with it and the image of a child at a zoo is, of course, one that speaks of wonder and love for the natural world."   (Laura Tomlinson)
"For me this puzzle represents the love between generations. It belonged to my mum and her sisters and was always at my gran's house when we went to visit. My own children have played with it and the image of a child at a zoo is, of course, one that speaks of wonder and love for the natural world." (Laura Tomlinson)

All images and captions above taken from Jewish Museum's current Love exhibition.

Journeys — how many have you been on? Whether they’re emotional, geographical or spiritual, journeys have the power to stay with us, forming a part of who we are and influencing the paths we choose to take in the future.

If you have an object that represents any type of journey you have made, you can lend it to the Jewish Museum for display in their upcoming exhibition. Everyone is welcome to contribute to Journeys — the second in the Your Jewish Museum series. Jewish or not, members of the public are welcome to submit anything from photographs to keepsakes, fine art to battered souvenirs. If it reflects your personal journey, they want to know about it.

The Your Jewish Museum series, produced in collaboration with the Cultural Institute at King’s College London, is all about carving a new path in community-led curation and provides a new opportunity for the public to engage with small to medium-sized museums.

Currently on display at The Jewish Museum is the first exhibition in the series, on the theme of Love. A touching display of real emotional depth, here too people have donated their personal objects alongside intimate and moving testimonies of exactly what these objects mean to them. The photo gallery above takes you through some of these items.

If you want to be in with a chance of being part of the Journeys display, just email a photo of your object and a description of how it fits the theme of Journeys (100 words max) to yourjewishmuseum@gmail.com by 15 March 2015.

Journeys will be open to the public 26 May - 4 September 2015 at Jewish Museum London, Raymond Burton House, 129-131 Albert Street, London, NW1 7NB. Love is currently on display until 19 April 2015. For more information and to book advance tickets, visit the Jewish Museum website.

Last Updated 03 March 2015