Frack Off Says Artist Sam Peacock

Tabish Khan
By Tabish Khan Last edited 43 months ago
Frack Off Says Artist Sam Peacock
Copyright Sam Peacock
Copyright Sam Peacock
Copyright Sam Peacock
Copyright Sam Peacock
Copyright Sam Peacock
Copyright Sam Peacock
Copyright Sam Peacock
Copyright Sam Peacock
Copyright Sam Peacock
Copyright Sam Peacock

Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing to give it its proper name, has been making a lot of headlines in the last few years. Some argue it will destroy the environment and pollute local water supplies while others make the case for it being a vital part of our future energy mix.

Despite the fact that many artists make political works, we've not come across any who have tackled this controversial subject to date. Sam Peacock is an artist who has based his latest series of works upon this weighty subject; it was triggered when he heard that his home town of Rugby may be subject to nearby fracking.

Peacock's previous landscapes have been made with some unusual ingredients including liquorice, coffee beans and demerara sugar. This unique mix has given the works a texture that reminds us of the works of Anselm Kiefer. For his fracking works, he's expanding this practice further into three dimensions.

The use of plaster will give each work a unique contour to align with the landscapes near potential future fracking sites. He will then break into them to create fractures within his work just as the land will be affected by fracking. Though Peacock is anti-fracking, the work itself isn't taking sides on the fracking debate — rather showing both the impacts on the earth and the creation of aesthetically pleasing art proving that the fracking debate is racked with ambiguity.

The exhibition itself will only be on for 10 days but will contain 48 smaller and four large scale works. It's one we're looking forward to, both to see the final products and to see people's reactions to Peacock's tackling of this controversial subject.

Sam Peacock: Fractured will be on at Curious Duke gallery, 173 Whitecross Street, EC1Y 8JT from 5-15 March. Entrance is free.

Last Updated 28 February 2015