World's Most Complete Stegosaurus Skeleton Unveiled In London

Laura Reynolds
By Laura Reynolds Last edited 38 months ago
World's Most Complete Stegosaurus Skeleton Unveiled In London
© NHM, London
© NHM, London
 © NHM, London
© NHM, London
© NHM, London
© NHM, London
Dinosaur researcher Paul Barrett with the stegosaurus skeleton © Trustees of NHM, London
Dinosaur researcher Paul Barrett with the stegosaurus skeleton © Trustees of NHM, London
A computer model of the stegosaurus © Trustees of NHM, London
A computer model of the stegosaurus © Trustees of NHM, London
 © NHM, London
© NHM, London

The most complete skeleton of a stegosaurus ever found has been unveiled at the Natural History Museum.

The fossil remains are about the size of a 4x4 vehicle, and consist of over 300 bones, with only the left arm and the base of the tail missing. It was excavated in Wyoming, in 2003. A group of scientists from the museum saw a model of it on a trip to the USA, and were able to buy it following an appeal to donors.

The only stegosaurus in a public collection outside of the USA, it arrived at the Natural History Museum in December 2013, but was hidden from public view while behind-the-scenes research was carried out, including taking measurements, photographs, laser surface scans and CT scans. The information will be used to further understand the life of the beasts.

The last detailed study of a stegosaurus was undertaken in 1914. A century later, this new specimen allows scientists to examine factors that have never been studied before, such as how its jaw worked while it was feeding.

The stegosaurus takes pride of place in the museum, in front of the recognisable escalator in the Earth Hall.

For more information visit the Natural History Museum website.

Last Updated 04 December 2014