What's On In London Theatre 11-17 September

By Zoe Craig Last edited 71 months ago
What's On In London Theatre 11-17 September

Here are a few highlights from London’s theatrical calendar for the next seven days

THEATRE
As the World Shakespeare Festival draws to a close, one of its biggest names takes to the stage. Star of stage and screen Jonathan Price is playing the lead in King Lear at the Almeida Theatre: the show opens following previews tonight.

Two other shows starting their runs tonight are The Duchess of Malfi at the White Bear Theatre and Bed at the Brockley Jack Theatre.

Elsewhere, there are other star names treading the boards in London’s Theatreland. Tomorrow is the opening night for The Judas Kiss at the Hampstead Theatre starring Rupert Everett and Freddie Fox; and Hedda Gabler opens tomorrow at the Old Vic, starring double Olivier Award-winner Sheridan Smith. Feminist classic Hindle Wakes opens at the Finborough Theatre tomorrow too. Over at the Young Vic, a production of Chekhov’s Three Sisters opens on Thursday. Also opening on Thursday is Baggage, a tale of internet dating at the Arts Theatre and Love And Information, Caryl Churchill’s new play, at the Royal Court Theatre.

Sunset Baby, a play about politics, fathers and daughters opens at the Gate Theatre on Monday, as does The Mystery of Charles Dickens, Simon Callow’s one-man show exploring the life and characters of our mutual friend Charles at the Playhouse Theatre.

OPERA
Not one, but two operas are opening this week. Take your pick from The Magic Flute at the London Coliseum from Thursday, or Julietta (at the same venue) from Monday.

DANCE
The San Francisco Ballet, America’s oldest ballet company, are at Sadler’s Wells from Friday this week. They’re presenting three eclectic programmes of their most popular works from recent years. Look out for George Balanchine’s iconic large-scale work Divertimento No 15, set to Mozart; and Possokhov’s multimedia dance theatre work RAkU, based on the story of the burning of Kyoto’s Golden Pavilion in 1950.

Have we missed anything? Let us know what you’re looking forward to seeing in the comments below.

Last Updated 11 September 2012