Art Review: Still Live @ Sarah Myerscough

Tabish Khan
By Tabish Khan Last edited 65 months ago
Art Review: Still Live @ Sarah Myerscough
Ori Gerscht, Falling Bird Imbalances. Courtesy Sarah Myerscough
Ori Gerscht, Falling Bird Imbalances. Courtesy Sarah Myerscough
Sean Roh, Meltdown. Courtesy Sarah Myerscough
Sean Roh, Meltdown. Courtesy Sarah Myerscough
Soukwon Yoon, Consolation. Courtesy Sarah Myerscough
Soukwon Yoon, Consolation. Courtesy Sarah Myerscough
Alan Robb, Ze Palladio. Courtesy Sarah Myerscough
Alan Robb, Ze Palladio. Courtesy Sarah Myerscough
Paul Riley, Green Column. Courtesy Sarah Myerscough
Paul Riley, Green Column. Courtesy Sarah Myerscough

Still life is seen as quite a dull genre of art — probably because it's the first kind of art that you learn at school (finger painting aside). After a couple of shows featuring dazzling cityscapes the latest exhibition at Sarah Myerscough looks at what photography can do to re-invigorate this genre.

Eight different artists have provided their own representations of photographic still life ranging from Paul Riley's minimalist works through to Suokwon Yoon's broody noirish pieces.

The stalwart of still life is fruit, yet Leticia Felgueroso's buffet is unsettling. It resembles a painting and begs the questions why is there nobody around the fruit? And why does the table appear to be hovering in mid-air.

Our clear favourite is Leon Steele's Balloon Tiptych, where he has captured snapshots of a balloon as it deflates. The motion blur in his photographs gives the works a balletic beauty that captivates the viewer.

The quality of the exhibition is mixed but it's great to see a tired genre given a new life and there are a few gems to be seen.

Still Live is on at Sarah Myerscough, 15-16 Brooks Mews, W1K 4DS until 29 September. Entrance is free.

Last Updated 07 September 2012