The Friday Photos: London Construction

TimW
By TimW Last edited 66 months ago
The Friday Photos: London Construction
Canary Wharf Construction, by Richwat2011
Canary Wharf Construction, by Richwat2011
Leadenhall reflected, by st_hart
Leadenhall reflected, by st_hart
The St George Tower grows in Vauxhall, by Prad Patel
The St George Tower grows in Vauxhall, by Prad Patel
The Cheese Grater under construction, by Jason Webber
The Cheese Grater under construction, by Jason Webber
The Walkie Talkie seen from Hays Lane, by cybertect
The Walkie Talkie seen from Hays Lane, by cybertect
And from across the river, by Matt from London
And from across the river, by Matt from London
Blackfriars Bridge, by Fred Adams
Blackfriars Bridge, by Fred Adams
The Place at London Bridge Quarter, by PastLondon
The Place at London Bridge Quarter, by PastLondon
And finally... Crane porn, by Prad Patel
And finally... Crane porn, by Prad Patel

Recession or not, London still resembles a building site. From the Walkie Talkie and Cheese Grater in the City to the London Bridge development and St George Wharf Tower south of the river (and even Blackfriars Bridge in between), the capital continues to sprout funny shaped structures.

All the accoutrements of building sites — the cranes, the scaffolding and the unfinished steel and concrete — makes for great images. Completed skyscrapers dazzle us with their glass and steel, but works-in-progress are much more interesting to look up at.

All images from the Londonist Flickr pool: richwat2011, cybertect, Matt from London, Jason Webber, st_hart, Prad Patel (x2), Anatoleya, Fred Adams and PastLondon.

Last Updated 31 August 2012

Michal

Here's one I took last weekend showing the number of cranes currently operating in what is just a small part of Central London: http://www.flickr.com/photos/d...

Kay

There is certainly an element of excitement to this London growth. One NY Times reporter compared it to Manhattan at the turn of the last century in the number of hight rise developments under construction. It is coming at a cost though. For starters central London has now become fully 'corporate gentrified', and that means that the corporations fully took over the centre of the capital and have raised the price of land so much that normal Londoners cannot even think of renting houses in that area. We've already seen this in EC1, the square mile, which is now just businesses while down the years residents have been pushed out. This, coupled with the new government housing benefit cap means that central London is now just a place where only Russian oligarchs, Arabs and other rich folks can afford to live in, which is sad, because this just creates social tension between the ring surrounding central London (which includes some of London's poorest areas) and the centre. Already some of these areas feel like ghettos...

simon

I think the walkie-talkie will be a water-shed moment when London asks itself if it's gone too far. The W-T is so close to the river in such a prominent position! Sticking a garden on top won't be enough.