Pedestrian Countdown Now At Stratford Station

BethPH
By BethPH Last edited 68 months ago
Pedestrian Countdown Now At Stratford Station

Transport for London's rollout of pedestrian crossing countdown timers has reached Stratford, with one newly-installed outside the station.

The timers have a digital display showing how long pedestrians have to cross the road. Previously trialled from 2010, the crossing received a very positive response with 83% of pedestrians saying they liked the idea.

The Stratford crossing is one of eight which TfL plan to install before the Olympics; you can see further proposed sites here. By 2014, there will be around 200 countdown crossings.

If you're a regular road-crosser outside Stratford station, let us know in the comments if the countdown makes a difference to you.

Photo by HoosierSands in the Londonist Flickr pool.

Last Updated 19 June 2012

TheoGB

I think it would be better to count down the time until they change. Surely you know how much time you have to cross by the blinking green man?

RobertD

There's another one already up in working at Tooting Bec station, following on from the trial blazer up in Balham. It makes it significantly easier and safer to do a big Japanese style diagonal cross of the road.

AJ

Have they combined it with a SHORTER pedestrian cycle, as at other places? I like the idea but not if it's used as an excuse to give us less time to cross.

Tim

I'm a regular road crosser at Stratford (probably 6-10 times a day) and the countdown makes a difference to me because now I know how long I have until the lights change colour. 

Andy Brice

I wish they'd also tell you how long you have to wait until the next green man. Taking away small uncertainties like this can really reduce perceived waiting times.

James

So yes, please can you tell us if the ped green time has been reduced at the same time?

Sadly these appear to be just another method to reduce the amount of time for people to cross the road and keep the motor traffic 'flowing' because Boris Johnson values cars more than people