2012 Olympic Ticket Prices Released

Rachel Holdsworth
By Rachel Holdsworth Last edited 90 months ago
2012 Olympic Ticket Prices Released

olympicstadium_151010.jpg
"Wanna come in? That'll be an arm and a leg, please." Image by gary8345 from the Londonist Flickr pool
The entry bid for London 2012 said there'd be "4.3 million £20 tickets and 6.2 million tickets to be sold for less than £30". Today's release of ticket prices for each sport reveals that actually, just 2.5m are the lowest priced, and 1.3m of those will be reserved for the 'pay your age' tickets for under 16s. Is this the affordable games we were promised?

As far as we can tell, every sport has a £20 option, but these are usually only for the preliminary rounds and - with some sports having five ticket price categories - there's no way of telling how far away from the action you'll be. Tickets for the Athletics prelims in the Olympic stadium range from £20 to £150 per ticket, for example, and while LOCOG say "all ticket prices will provide a great Games experience", we wonder whether £20 ticket holders should go expecting to soak up some atmosphere rather than hoping to spot Usain Bolt on the track.

Other wallet-busting options include £450 to watch the beach volleyball, diving, swimming and artistic gymnastics finals from the best seats (is it just us, or are these the sports where the athletes don't, er, wear very much?), £325 for the velodrome, £275 for the equestrian finals, £425 for men's boxing and £395 for men's basketball finals. Bargain hunters may want to consider the triathlon in Hyde Park (top price £60), shooting in Woolwich (£40) or the chance to catch play on No 1 court in Wimbledon for about £75. Though in this case, 'bargain' depends on whether you've got a family...

One in eight schoolchildren will also get free tickets (though that means 7 out of 8 will not) and, appallingly, there are no concessions for locals either.

While initial stages of each sport means you at least get to see all the stars as they plough their way to the finals, surely what we want is packed stadia cheering on Team GB to victory when the medals are sorted out. At these prices, the big screens in the Olympic Park may be the closest many of us get to sporting glory.

Last Updated 15 October 2010

Lettershaper

Very much enjoyed the time I spent reading and looking around your site...as a poet and an avid reader, I found it a most rewarding look. Thank you...

Tomtiredoflondon

I must admit before today's news I hadn't quite realised how high ticket prices were likely to be, and had figured the organisers would be keen to attract those living in the area.

Foolishly perhaps, I had assumed that as I have already double paid for it through general taxation and the Council Tax, the millions of tickets might be lower.

I think a lot of people would probably feel the same, considering the £9bn+ price tag.

zefrog

£750 for the men's 100m final... That's Mr Bolt in action for just under £76 per second...

RachelH

I think stupid prices for the best seats at the most popular events was always going to happen; what's got people understandably spitting blood is the fewer-than-promised cheap seats, no discounts for locals, cheap tickets for kids restricted to the unpoplar events... It's all very tempting to hold back and see if they're panicked into selling off tickets cheaply on the day just to fill the stadia.

alaninbow

I live less than a mile from the stadium, but this just confirms that I won't bother to go. These Olympics are just an expensive way for our politicians to be seen on TV.

CRAiG

best to get your information direct at the link below. to protray the thousands of free tickets for kids as somehow "excluding" the rest seems tortuous.

http://www.london2012.com/news...

millions of cheap tickets available, obviously the highest-price luxury tickets subsidise all the cheap ones.

Tomtiredoflondon

I must admit before today's news I hadn't quite realised how high ticket prices were likely to be, and had figured the organisers would be keen to attract those living in the area.
Foolishly perhaps, I had assumed that as I have already double paid for it through general taxation and the Council Tax, the millions of tickets might be lower.
I think a lot of people would probably feel the same, considering the £9bn+ price tag.

zefrog

£750 for the men's 100m final... That's Mr Bolt in action for just under £76 per second...

RachelH

I think stupid prices for the best seats at the most popular events was always going to happen; what's got people understandably spitting blood is the fewer-than-promised cheap seats, no discounts for locals, cheap tickets for kids restricted to the unpoplar events... It's all very tempting to hold back and see if they're panicked into selling off tickets cheaply on the day just to fill the stadia.

alaninbow

I live less than a mile from the stadium, but this just confirms that I won't bother to go. These Olympics are just an expensive way for our politicians to be seen on TV.

CRAiG

best to get your information direct at the link below. to protray the thousands of free tickets for kids as somehow "excluding" the rest seems tortuous.
http://www.london2012.com/news/2010/10/london-2012-announces-olympic-games-ticket-prices.php
millions of cheap tickets available, obviously the highest-price luxury tickets subsidise all the cheap ones.

RachelH

Careful with your use of quotation marks there! Nobody's said anything about anyone being "excluded", though from talking to parents on Twitter today, they feel that is what's happened to them and their families.
The link you provide talks about the Ticketshare scheme - which is the 1 in 8 schoolchildren; in fact, LOCOG are only supplying 50,000 of the 125,000 tickets available, the Mayor's office has underwritten the cost of the other 75,000 - and the Pay Your Age scheme, and we don't know which events that applies to yet, though I think we're fair to assume it'll be the less popular ones, i.e., the heats. I can't see anything in the LOCOG release that contradicts the article.

Martin

Has anyone mentioned the small elephant in the room - the ticketing provider is Ticketmaster. Will that be £20 plus £3 per ticket order processing fee plus £5.20 secure postage? (Oh, and payment by Visa only, thankyouverymuch)

Martin

Has anyone mentioned the small elephant in the room - the ticketing provider is Ticketmaster. Will that be £20 plus £3 per ticket order processing fee plus £5.20 secure postage? (Oh, and payment by Visa only, thankyouverymuch)

CRAiG

I think most other outlets have reported it on balance. I'm disappointed Londonist has taken the tack it has - you seem to have taken the worst bits of some relatively poor analysis and parroted it without thought.

When a family with (say) 2 parents + 2 kids aged 10 and 5 can spend £55 to come see the greatest show on earth then that's not half bad. (2x £20 adult ticket + 1 £10 ticket + 1 £5 ticket). How is that not affordable? It compares really well with sporting or theatre events in London. And each of them gets a 1-6 zone travelcard to enjoy London around that included!

The expensive tickets effectively subsidise the cheap ones. There are as many £2012 tickets for the Opening Ceremony as £20.12 ones.

The announcement yesterday was just Olympic tickets, not Paralympic - and the quote you twist above from 5 years relates to *both*. There will be many more cheap tickets announced later.

If you want special concessions to locals (because without it it's "appalling") who do you remove those from, elsewhere? Kids in lewisham? Bexley? Name your boroughs. Why should Sutton schools have less tickets when they have less access to the world's best facilities; new social housing; and the greatest urban park in Europe for 150 years than the locals?) If you want even cheaper entry tickets, how much do you knock the expensive ones up to?

There are indeed £20 options in every sport (you didn't need your little snide "as far as we can tell" on that one.)

You'll know that LOCOG needs to raise half a billion pounds through tickets (to avoid coming to Government to ask for public funds) so how would you do it? Or do you want Government to fork up?

You're right you didn't say "excluding" 7 in 8, my bad on the quotation marks - you just said "7 out of 8 will not get free tickets". I wrote in haste and shock because I was surprised that Londonist would take such a negative attitude. You did the same on volunteers before, writing about how McDonald's were training and selecting them - http://londonist.com/2010/07/t... (another fabrication).

It's only my personal view, but I think this is a half-baked article scoring cheap points. Stand by it as much as you want, but I think Londonist readers deserve better.

CRAiG

I think most other outlets have reported it on balance. I'm disappointed Londonist has taken the tack it has - you seem to have taken the worst bits of some relatively poor analysis and parroted it without thought.
When a family with (say) 2 parents + 2 kids aged 10 and 5 can spend £55 to come see the greatest show on earth then that's not half bad. (2x £20 adult ticket + 1 £10 ticket + 1 £5 ticket). How is that not affordable? It compares really well with sporting or theatre events in London. And each of them gets a 1-6 zone travelcard to enjoy London around that included!
The expensive tickets effectively subsidise the cheap ones. There are as many £2012 tickets for the Opening Ceremony as £20.12 ones.
The announcement yesterday was just Olympic tickets, not Paralympic - and the quote you twist above from 5 years relates to *both*. There will be many more cheap tickets announced later.
If you want special concessions to locals (because without it it's "appalling") who do you remove those from, elsewhere? Kids in lewisham? Bexley? Name your boroughs. Why should Sutton schools have less tickets when they have less access to the world's best facilities; new social housing; and the greatest urban park in Europe for 150 years than the locals?) If you want even cheaper entry tickets, how much do you knock the expensive ones up to?
There are indeed £20 options in every sport (you didn't need your little snide "as far as we can tell" on that one.)
You'll know that LOCOG needs to raise half a billion pounds through tickets (to avoid coming to Government to ask for public funds) so how would you do it? Or do you want Government to fork up?
You're right you didn't say "excluding" 7 in 8, my bad on the quotation marks - you just said "7 out of 8 will not get free tickets". I wrote in haste and shock because I was surprised that Londonist would take such a negative attitude. You did the same on volunteers before, writing about how McDonald's were training and selecting them - http://londonist.com/2010/07/train_as_a_2012_mcgames_maker.php (another fabrication).
It's only my personal view, but I think this is a half-baked article scoring cheap points. Stand by it as much as you want, but I think Londonist readers deserve better.

RachelH

Actually, these are my real opinions rather than being influenced by the "worst bits of analysis". LOCOG hasn't helped itself by the amount of uncertainty surrounding which events the Pay Your Age tickets will be available for but the general assumption is that it will be the less popular events, or the heats. These, with the best will in the world, will not be the greatest show on earth. They are sporting administrative tasks - qualify, go home. The greatest show on earth will be the finals and the medal ceremonies but even the cheapest tckets for those will be well away from the action. And as yet, we still don't know how many £2012 and £20.12 tickets will be available - for all we know there'll be 100 of each!

I didn't realise the quote at the start was for both events and I apologise, but I do take issue with the assertion that it was deliberately "twisted", as I do with "snide" (the phrase "as far as we can tell" was to cover myself in case I'd missed an event that didn't have a £20 option).

In terms of locals, I certainly think at least Greenwich kids should have access to the Games to compensate for losing access to large parts of their local park for up to eight months. And the rest? Yes, I think Sutton schools should have fewer tickets than the schools who have had the works on their doorstep and live in Olympic boroughs.

RachelH

Actually, these are my real opinions rather than being influenced by the "worst bits of analysis". LOCOG hasn't helped itself by the amount of uncertainty surrounding which events the Pay Your Age tickets will be available for but the general assumption is that it will be the less popular events, or the heats. These, with the best will in the world, will not be the greatest show on earth. They are sporting administrative tasks - qualify, go home. The greatest show on earth will be the finals and the medal ceremonies but even the cheapest tckets for those will be well away from the action. And as yet, we still don't know how many £2012 and £20.12 tickets will be available - for all we know there'll be 100 of each!
I didn't realise the quote at the start was for both events and I apologise, but I do take issue with the assertion that it was deliberately "twisted", as I do with "snide" (the phrase "as far as we can tell" was to cover myself in case I'd missed an event that didn't have a £20 option).
In terms of locals, I certainly think at least Greenwich kids should have access to the Games to compensate for losing access to large parts of their local park for up to eight months. And the rest? Yes, I think Sutton schools should have fewer tickets than the schools who have had the works on their doorstep and live in Olympic boroughs.

BarSuk

For most it's not expensive. I believe agree with me.

markle

So:

Would people prefer that we all paid more tax to subsidise for the games, and that we then get 'cheap' tickets in return?

The games have to be paid for somehow, I'd rather that the people who wanted to go paid for it, rather than make everyone in London subsidise it for a few.

It wouldn't surprise me if they offer discounted locals' tickets *after* the first release of tickets, so that they can see which events have a poor takeup, and use a "local ticket offer" as a promotion to boost sales for those events.

Did you really expect every ticket to be £10? I have to say, £20.12 is a fantastic price for the opening ceremony...

Lindsey

"You did the same on volunteers before, writing about how McDonald's were training and selecting them - http://londonist.com/2010/07/train_as_a_2012_mcgames_maker.php (another fabrication)"
That information was drawn directly from the McDonalds press release linked to from the post which says: "McDonald's will use its expertise in customer service and people development, as well as its nationwide presence, to help attract, select and train the diverse team of volunteers, known as Games Makers"

Tomtiredoflondon

It's only my personal view
But it says here that you work for London 2012 - http://londonist.com/2010/03/london_2012_tickets_londoners_urged.php
Surely it's hard to be objective when they pay your salary?

BarSuk

For most it's not expensive. I believe agree with me.

markle

So:
Would people prefer that we all paid more tax to subsidise for the games, and that we then get 'cheap' tickets in return?
The games have to be paid for somehow, I'd rather that the people who wanted to go paid for it, rather than make everyone in London subsidise it for a few.
It wouldn't surprise me if they offer discounted locals' tickets *after* the first release of tickets, so that they can see which events have a poor takeup, and use a "local ticket offer" as a promotion to boost sales for those events.
Did you really expect every ticket to be £10? I have to say, £20.12 is a fantastic price for the opening ceremony...

RachelH

But hang on, haven't we already paid levies on council tax?