Bank Of England Museum: Priceless Pieces Of Paper

Lindsey
By Lindsey Last edited 95 months ago
Bank Of England Museum: Priceless Pieces Of Paper
Letter dated March 1956 from HM Treasury informing the Bank that the Queen has given permission for her portrait to be used on banknotes - have you seen A Decoration and a Safeguard special display yet?
Letter dated March 1956 from HM Treasury informing the Bank that the Queen has given permission for her portrait to be used on banknotes - have you seen A Decoration and a Safeguard special display yet?
A cash note from 1700 bearing the words: Promise to pay.... a legend still found on modern bank notes
A cash note from 1700 bearing the words: Promise to pay.... a legend still found on modern bank notes
Political Ravishment, or The Old Lady of Threadneedle-street in Danger!, a satirical cartoon attacking Prime Minister William Pitt the Younger's decision on 26 January 1797 to temporarily forbid the Bank of England from paying out in gold, having it issue banknotes instead. This cartoon is thought to be the origin of the nickname "Old Lady of Threadneedle Street" for the Bank of England. The male figure is William Pitt the Younger. Published 1797.
Political Ravishment, or The Old Lady of Threadneedle-street in Danger!, a satirical cartoon attacking Prime Minister William Pitt the Younger's decision on 26 January 1797 to temporarily forbid the Bank of England from paying out in gold, having it issue banknotes instead. This cartoon is thought to be the origin of the nickname "Old Lady of Threadneedle Street" for the Bank of England. The male figure is William Pitt the Younger. Published 1797.
The Bank of England's first charter - The royal seal of the joint monarchs, William and Mary, was affixed on 27th July 1694. The document laid down the conditions under which the Governor and Company of the Bank of England were to operate.
The Bank of England's first charter - The royal seal of the joint monarchs, William and Mary, was affixed on 27th July 1694. The document laid down the conditions under which the Governor and Company of the Bank of England were to operate.

Our final post about our March museum of the month looks at a few of the documents, paper artifacts and banknotes lodged in the Bank of England Museum's collection.

We couldn't get you a shot of the million pound note, unfortunately, but go and gaze on its delicate, never cashed splendour in the museum when you can. Check out the Banknote Gallery too, with its range of issued notes dating from the late 17th century, original artwork by note designers, and an unrivalled collection of forgeries.

Just out side the gallery, the museum has a corner of the Rotunda dedicated to one its most famous employees, Kenneth Grahame, author of The Wind in the Willows, among other works. He rose through the Bank ranks to become Secretary but resigned in 1908. His handwritten resignation letter is on display, begging ill health. However, another letter is also on display, which suggests that Grahame was bullied at work. Sad to think that his delightful bucolic children's stories, written whilst employed at the Bank, were perhaps providing welcome escapism from the bureaucracy and oppressive grind of Bank life.

The Bank of England Museum's website could do with a revamp but there's a surprising amount of information available in it, if only you click in the right bits! Click on photos to get more info and take a walk through time with this rather natty interactive timeline. .

The museum is open Mon-Fri, 10am-5pm and is free to all.

Last Updated 30 March 2010