Mayor Finds Transport Policy

By Jonn Last edited 100 months ago
Mayor Finds Transport Policy

tube.jpeg Christmas has come early for London's crowd of map-spotters: not before time, Boris has published his Transport Strategy.

The tabloids are already all over plans for a road-pricing scheme which would mean it could cost as much as £20 to drive into central London, but that's just one policy in a document thick enough to serve as a blunt weapon should you feel the need. Other highlights include more details of the planned cycle hire scheme, the Mayoral ambition to make London the electric car capital of the world, and a promise to force all national rail companies to accept Oyster card by the end of next year.

Perhaps the most fun to be had for transport spods, though, is the map on p261. The serial numbers have been rubbed off, but squint and you'll find it unmistakably includes a new tube line from Chelsea to Hackney; a southbound Bakerloo extension to Hayes; a DLR extension to Catford; and, most confusingly, a Victoria line extension to Stratford.

For those of a more morbid disposition there's also a flood risk map on p265, which shows you how likely you are to wake up one morning to find your post is soggy and your door mat has floated away. (You're pretty much fine if you're north of the river. If you live in Kennington you should start stocking up on sandbags now, though.)

You can read the full document here. But if you can't face trawling through 350 pages of official TfLese, we suggest keeping an eye on the ever informative London Reconnections blog.

Image courtesy of Superciliousness under a creative commons licence.

Last Updated 12 October 2009

Mr Thant

Errr... the report puts everything you mention is in the "post-2020" category, which is another way of saying Boris has no intention of doing anything about them.

(and I think it's a DLR extension up from Stratford International to Walthamstow doodled on that map)

Jonn

I didn't say _when_ they're due, just that they're in there.

(This is what happens when you try and read 350 page policy documents in 20 minutes during your lunchbreak.)

inbetweener

The new "tube line" is on the route of the mooted Crossrail 2 project, and thus is likely to actually be Crossrail 2...

Likelihood of all this stuff actually happening, I reckon < 5%.