There's Been Another Postal Strike. Like We Can Tell

Rachel Holdsworth
By Rachel Holdsworth Last edited 104 months ago
There's Been Another Postal Strike. Like We Can Tell

postbox_13Sep09.jpg Apparently there was another postal strike on Friday, as CWU members walked out again over Royal Mail "modernisation" which, according to who you listen to, is either much-needed change or job and pay cuts. But our first thought was, isn't it about time we stopped this pretence that what's happening is a series of discrete strikes? There's now a sorting and delivery backlog of 20 million items in London - most of them ours, we reckon - and the near-permanent delays surely mean we're just experiencing one, long, tedious strike. Take a look at action scheduled for next week, if you think there's any sodding point. (Image / JudyGr)

Last Updated 13 September 2009

cobo04

Seems the post office union doesn't seem to know that there are other carriers around these days happy to jump in to do letter collection. Where would that leave the post office?

markle

So that will explain why recently I've gone for days and days without mail. I've just assumed that the postie had lost the key fob for our block of flats.

Endless striking may be a bit of an own-goal for the unions, more and more people will eventually be forced to start using alternatives.

A quick glance at the CWU website says that one of their demands is a shorter working week and more pay. Another is job security. I'm sure some of the other demands are valid *but* if they focus on goals such as more pay for less work, it will take the light away form some of their more reasonable demands and just ends up in the deadlock that we now have...

RachelH

Markle, I think your post is in the same black hole as my Amazon delivery, a work contract and several other things. On the other hand, my copy of the New Scientist, which arrives through my door with the normal mail but appears to be sent via TNT, has turned up regular as someone who eats a lot of bran. *raises eyebrow*

subrosa

My housemate's had all her benefits stopped, because they sent her stuff in the post that she had to confirm (including a 'come to this meeting on this date or we stop all your benefits' letter), and it all arrived weeks late. Mind you, this could be the strikes or it could be the fact that our postman doesn't like to deliver post to the right address (we've had recorded delivery items, unsigned, put through the letterbox - which were meant for a completely different address). I am sick of officialdom assuming that the post is in any way reliable; why can't this be done by email, now the Royal Mail no longer works?

jamesup

Mine doesn't seem to be on strike but he does drop round with recorded items, tap on the door with the strength and enthusasum of a sedated child and then runs away before anyone can open the door.

Postal strikes are gods way of reminding us to set up direct debits and email billing.

M@

I'm luckier than most in that the only thing I use the mail for is my TimeOut subscription. And that's about to get cancelled anyhow.

Dave

The only thing that the Royal Mail have in their favour, in London at least, is their relatively large number of sorting offices compared to their competitors. It pains me greatly when some of the alternative carriers state that their "central London depot" is located in an industrial estate in Deptford.

Of course, bearing in mind that the Royal Mail are now well-known for not actually bothering to attempt to deliver parcels – everyone knows they just use the "you were out when we called" cards in all circumstances now – it's a good thing that they have so many sorting offices, 'cos everyone has to collect their stuff themselves anyway.

Of course, this is only useful when they bother pretending to attempt to deliver in the first place. I had two parcels dispatched to me, from the same place, on the 5th. The one dispatched using City Link arrived the next working day. 10 days later and I'm still waiting for any hint of the other one being delivered by Royal Mail.