In Pictures: Cricket In The Park

Dean Nicholas
By Dean Nicholas Last edited 111 months ago
In Pictures: Cricket In The Park
Applause as Jonathan Trott reaches his century
Applause as Jonathan Trott reaches his century
...luckily, there was a bar inside
...luckily, there was a bar inside
Safety concerns meant bottles had to be abandoned at the entrance
Safety concerns meant bottles had to be abandoned at the entrance
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Australia resorted to some unorthodox tactics to get back into the game
Australia resorted to some unorthodox tactics to get back into the game
Gives a new meaning to the phrase reverse swing
Gives a new meaning to the phrase reverse swing
Cheeseburgers, the classic cricket chow
Cheeseburgers, the classic cricket chow
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David Gower proves he's still got it
David Gower proves he's still got it
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Aussie captain Ricky Ponting grimaces as England rack up another six
Aussie captain Ricky Ponting grimaces as England rack up another six
Show your batting skills without risking a missing tooth
Show your batting skills without risking a missing tooth
Waiting for the wind-up
Waiting for the wind-up

For those unable to get a ticket for The Oval, it was the next best thing: the crowds descended upon Regent's Park on Saturday to watch the tail end of the final Ashes series of 2009 on a giant video screen.

A sense of optimism buoyed fans in the morning as they scented a famous victory, and the atmosphere only got better as England took a commanding position, racking up over 500 runs before eventually declaring on 545. At the close of play, Australia were 80-0, requiring a nigh-on impossible 466 runs.

Sunday is the last day of the series, and barring a collapse of unprecedented proportion, the Test, that diminutive trophy, and most importantly, the bragging rights for the next two years, will be England's. Get down to Regent's Park nice and early, stake out a place, and watch sporting history unfurl. Word of advice — the organisers aren't letting in glass bottles or cricket bats, so leave 'em at home.

Last Updated 23 August 2009