London Water: Now Even More Safe!

By london_alice Last edited 129 months ago
London Water: Now Even More Safe!
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When was the last time you had a nice refreshing glass of London tap water?

If the answer was 'Ew, never because tap water is gross and unsafe', then you're lucky Londonist is here, because we can tell you that there's nothing wrong with London's water. In fact, according to a report from the Drinking Water Inspectorate, London's water is improving. Last year, 99.98% of tap water samples met industry standards, which improved on 2005's 99.96%.

That means that for every 10,000 glasses of tap water you drink, only 2 will be substandard. Those are pretty good odds, we think. And with bottled water costing somewhere in the range of 95p per litre and tap water costing about £1 for 1000 litres, it becomes even more appealing. And if it ever actually turns into summer and gets properly hot, a nice glass of water will keep you cool.

If you don't like the taste of tap water, try keeping it in the fridge. When it's cold, you probably can't taste the difference between tap and bottled water.

Image taken from yoppy's Flickr photo stream

Last Updated 11 July 2007

guest

Oh come now, theres no use trying to convince us that tap water is drinkable, heres proof otherwise!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...

guest

just get a brita filter! much cheaper, and you're right, tap water tastes much better after it's been kept in the fridge.

guest

touche on the Brita filter! They rock.

guest

I think the argument for keeping it in the fridge making it taste okay is valid in so far is it does indeed make it taste better chilled (as does bad larger), but that's only one aspect in that it doesn't address the issue that it's the chemicals that are in it that (and shouldn't be) that are making it taste odd in the first place, which I think is a focus that is lost with the popular mime of discussing how to lower 'air miles' being forefront in everyone's mind.

I would also add I'm highly skeptical of the figure assigned to the cost of tap water. I don't doubt it's cheaper than tap water at a large scale - but does that cost really take account of all the water lost through inefficient delivery, and total cost to the businesses involved? (including subsidies, grants, tax breaks, etc.)