Be Hurled From Space In Virtual Reality At The Science Museum

Be Hurled From Space In Virtual Reality At The Science Museum

The Soyuz capsule that returned astronaut Tim Peake from the International Space Stations sits in the Science Museum. But what was it actually like to fall back to Earth from space?

Floating in space is the best part, and the graphics look superb. Copyright Science Museum.

Working with Tim Peake and the latest virtual reality technology, the Science Museum has created an experience which is probably as close as we're going to get to returning from orbit.

Peake gives us an introduction before we embark on a circa 15 minute experience that has us floating in space, watching flames out of the windows of our capsule, and finally crash landing back on terra firma.

Tim Peake is on hand to guide us back to Earth. Copyright Science Museum

The graphics are superb — we really feel like we're there. When we're 'floating' outside the capsule in space, looking down actually makes us feel a little weak at the knees — it's a long way down to that blue marble below us.

It's a lot less interesting outside the headset. Copyright Jody Kingzett, Science Museum.

Once inside the Soyuz capsule, Peake's narration does a great job of explaining what happens on the way down. This includes the procedures the astronauts have to go through... as well as the inherent risks.

As you can imagine there's lots of vibration on screen, and plenty of jolts on detaching from the space station, and landing. The problem is we're sat on a comfy chair and this takes us out of the moment. We would have preferred a D-Box chair, which moves and vibrates in sync with the video.

Seeing the sun rise from space is pretty special. Copyright Science Museum.

The experience itself is also a little pricey: £7 for something that's over in quarter of an hour. Having said that, it's still a thrilling and educational ride — and who doesn't want to play at being an astronaut?

Space Descent VR with Tim Peake is a new permanent experience at Science Museum. Tickets are £7 each.  

Last Updated 17 March 2017