A Dark, Robotic Last Supper At Science Museum

Tabish Khan
By Tabish Khan Last edited 6 months ago

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A Dark, Robotic Last Supper At Science Museum

We step into the darkness. Mist pumps out of the ceiling as we approach a table of robotic figures. They whirr into life and talk in hushed tones about sin, forgiveness, guilt and judgement.

The atmospheric Last Supper. Copyright the board of trustees of the Science Museum.

This is the Last Supper, but not as we know it; Giles Walker has created his pseudo-biblical scene using old CPR dummies. Bells ring and decks creak, as we realise we're all at sea.

One of the little bird headed skeletons. Copyright the board of trustees of the Science Museum.

Little bird-headed skeletons are scattered over the table while a child-like figure stands in front of a cross and watches over the meal with piercing eyes.

A close up of the sinners at the table. Copyright the board of trustees of the Science Museum.

Alas, he and we make up the few observers of this dark meal. Each performance holds up to 30, but there are just four of us in here. It's a crying shame a great work like this — free too — isn't being lapped up. Still, all the more dark deliciousness for us.

The Last Supper by Giles Walker is on at Studio, Media Space, Science Museum until 4 June. The performance runs every day at 11.15, 13.30, 15.45 & 16.30. Free to view.

Last Updated 15 May 2017