See What London Looked Like 600 Years Ago

By Zoe Craig Last edited 22 months ago

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See What London Looked Like 600 Years Ago
Gabriel Gualdo Priorato. Londra. [Italy, c.1675]. Engraved print on two sheets, joined. Image Courtesy of Daniel Crouch Rare Books.

There's a rare chance to see drawings of London dating back 600 years this week, as 200 images of London past go on display.

Daniel Crouch Rare Books, a specialist dealer in antique maps and atlases, is bringing a selection of images of London, charting 600 years of the city, to this year's Frieze Masters fair.

Won't make it to Frieze Masters? Fear not, we've got a selection of the drawings below, alongside modern photos of the locations for comparison.

Piccadilly Circus

Image Courtesy of Daniel Crouch Rare Books, Randolph Schwabe, Piccadilly Circus, Looking North, 1918.
Piccadilly Circus today.

Trinity House

Anonymous: View of the new Trinity House on Tower Hill
Trinity House today.

Mile End Almshouses

Simon Gribelin, An Almes-House at Mile-End near London belonging to Trinity-House, London, 1696-1722
The Almshouses today.

Temple Bar

Philip Audinet, after B. Cooper, West View of Temple Bar, London, Published as the Act directs by B. Cooper, No.4 Earl Street, Chatham Square, 1 Sept 1797. Image Courtesy of Daniel Crouch Rare Books.
Temple Bar Gate today.

Bank of England

Henry Carington Bowles and Samuel Carver, A View of the Bank of England, Threadneedle Street, London. Published by F West, 83 Fleet Street, c.1840. Image Courtesy of Daniel Crouch Rare Books.
Bank of England today.

Fishmongers' Hall

L. Haghe, Fishmongers' Hall, London. Henry Roberts Architect, London Day & Haghe, Lithrs. to the King c.1835. Courtesy of Daniel Crouch Rare Books.
Fishmongers' Hall today.

Frieze Masters runs from 6 to 9 October. Find out more at frieze.com/frieze-masters

Last Updated 07 October 2016