25 June 2017 | 16.5 °C

London's Most Photogenic Tube Stations

M@
By M@ Last edited 8 months ago
London's Most Photogenic Tube Stations

London Underground is an endless source of inspiration for photography. We've picked eight stations we think are particularly photogenic, and illustrated them with the best shots from the Londonist Flickr pool. Which tube stations would you add?

Southgate

Looking like Jabba's Palace from Return of the Jedi, Southgate station opened in 1933 and was designed by Charles Holden.

By Brandon A in the Londonist Flickr pool.

Gants Hill

Many Londoners never visit this corner of the Central line, but the journey is worthwhile to bask in the barrel-vaulted glory of this Charles Holden creation. The platform area is reminiscent of the Moscow Metro, on which Holden advised. It's one of the few stations to open in the 1940s.

By Sean Batten in the Londonist Flickr pool.

Canary Wharf

From the firm of Norman Foster, Canary Wharf station is housed in a vast concrete cavern. It's often said that you could fit 1 Canada Square (the tallest Canary Wharf tower) in its void. The station opened in 1999 as part of the Jubilee line extension.

Canary Wharf station.
By Lee Pelling in the Londonist Flickr pool.

Wembley Park

Chosen less for its architectural merits and more for the human activity on show. The steps outside the station resemble old football terraces, and are full of colour and noise on a match day.

By Paul Wright in the Londonist Flickr pool.

Baker Street

One of the original stations on London Underground, Baker Street opened in 1863. The Circle line platforms retain many Victorian features.

By Pete Rowbottom in the Londonist Flickr pool.

Sudbury Town

The archetypal Charles Holden station, Sudbury Town has an elegance and simplicity to be enjoyed more on each visit. Holden's rebuilt station opened in 1932.

By Jack Gordon in the Londonist Flickr pool.

East Finchley

The station itself is a joy with its curvy glass towers, but it is the sculptural archer who most often attracts the camera lens. His aim is through the Northern line tunnel to Morden, once the longest tunnel in the world if trivia books are to be believed.

By Jon Dickens in the Londonist Flickr pool.

Westminster

Another Jubilee line extension station, Westminster is a cat's cradle of concrete-clad beams and wandering escalators.

By D A Scott in the Londonist Flickr pool.

Last Updated 25 October 2016

Ben Thompson

I hate the jubilee line. It reminds me of the 1960s concrete jungles created like Thamesmead. The one good thing is that it has barriers stopping people falling on the tracks

John Gilham

Osterley. A rare delight amid rows of semis.

Mike Paterson

Barons Court is very pretty. I like Gloucester Road because its two-in-one 1870s and 1900s Leslie Green variants, plus atmospheric lighting below ground similar to your Baker Street example. And talking about Leslie Green...?

Per John Gilham, below, I agree that Osterley brightens up a very dull stretch of A4, but it totally relies on its tower, without which it's very ordinary Holden fare, but then, you could argue, that was his genius.

Markovitch

Rayners Lane should be on the list, but I know there are many contenders

kombizz

Lovely collection of images, although there are more to London in the sense of beauty.
Thank you for sharing.