A Working Class Statue Is Something To Be...

M@
By M@ Last edited 31 months ago
A Working Class Statue Is Something To Be...

Not all of London's statues depict forgotten generals, eminent politicians and equestrian royalty. Dotted across town you will find a surprisingly numerous population of everyday workers, from gardeners to dock workers. Alas, this bronze workforce is almost exclusively male. One of the few exceptions is the Women of World War II memorial on Whitehall, but this depicts uniforms rather than the actual workers. The likeness of Florence Nightingale, going about her business as the Lady of the Lamp, is another.

'Deal porters' by Philip Bews has decorated Surrey Quays since 1990. It shows a couple of porters hefting around planks of wood.
'Deal porters' by Philip Bews has decorated Surrey Quays since 1990. It shows a couple of porters hefting around planks of wood.
Stables Market in Camden Town is overcrowded with sculptures depicting farriers, blacksmiths, horses and - shown here - fire extinguisher inspectors.
Stables Market in Camden Town is overcrowded with sculptures depicting farriers, blacksmiths, horses and - shown here - fire extinguisher inspectors.
Out in the Fields is a simple, pastoral sculpture by Arthur G Atkinson, which can be found at Kew Gardens.
Out in the Fields is a simple, pastoral sculpture by Arthur G Atkinson, which can be found at Kew Gardens.
"Trade Union Spirit" by Bernard Meadows is perhaps the ultimate symbol of the worker helping his fellow man. It can be found on the trade union building in Bloomsbury.
"Trade Union Spirit" by Bernard Meadows is perhaps the ultimate symbol of the worker helping his fellow man. It can be found on the trade union building in Bloomsbury.
A gardener, as sculpted by Karin Jonzen in 1971, hunches over to tackle the grounds of Brewers Hall on London Wall.
A gardener, as sculpted by Karin Jonzen in 1971, hunches over to tackle the grounds of Brewers Hall on London Wall.
A window cleaner whose equipment seems woefully inadequate for the job at hand. This one's by Allan Sly and can be found outside Edgware Road station.
A window cleaner whose equipment seems woefully inadequate for the job at hand. This one's by Allan Sly and can be found outside Edgware Road station.
One of our favourites, the Dockers Sculpture lurks beside the ExCel centre at Royal Victoria Docks. The three workers represent actual people: John Ringwood, a former seaman; stevedore Patrick Holland; and Mark Tibbs of Canning Town.  It's by Les Johnson and stands about three metres high.
One of our favourites, the Dockers Sculpture lurks beside the ExCel centre at Royal Victoria Docks. The three workers represent actual people: John Ringwood, a former seaman; stevedore Patrick Holland; and Mark Tibbs of Canning Town. It's by Les Johnson and stands about three metres high.
One of London's most depressing sculptures, George Segal's 'Rush Hour' depicts a set of commuters on a miserable march to work. It's in the middle of Broadgate.
One of London's most depressing sculptures, George Segal's 'Rush Hour' depicts a set of commuters on a miserable march to work. It's in the middle of Broadgate.
Taxi! An office worker hails a cab on John Carpenter Street, just off Embankment.
Taxi! An office worker hails a cab on John Carpenter Street, just off Embankment.
The National Firefighters Memorial shows those workers in their finest hour, tackling the fires of the Blitz. It's by John W Mills and stands south of St Paul's, whose fabric they fought so valiantly, and successfully, to save.
The National Firefighters Memorial shows those workers in their finest hour, tackling the fires of the Blitz. It's by John W Mills and stands south of St Paul's, whose fabric they fought so valiantly, and successfully, to save.
A cordwainer was a type of shoemaker. This likeness is by Alma Boyes, and stands on Watling Street in Cordwainer Ward.
A cordwainer was a type of shoemaker. This likeness is by Alma Boyes, and stands on Watling Street in Cordwainer Ward.
Alan Wilson's building worker statue commemorates all those who work in the construction industry, and particularly those who lost their lives during such work. It's just north of the Tower of London.
Alan Wilson's building worker statue commemorates all those who work in the construction industry, and particularly those who lost their lives during such work. It's just north of the Tower of London.

All images by the author, except the building worker (Lonpicman), cordwainer (Oxyman), Florence Nightingale (Patche99z), and firefighters (Eluveitie), all published under Creative Commons licences.

Last Updated 29 April 2015

MissB

The 'yuppy' is warm and dry, busy making phone calls in the Ambulatory of the Guildhall.

WoolwichArt&History

Not a statue but a relief, representing the thousands of workers at the Royal Arsenal (80,000 in 1916). ''Workers of Woolwich'' (1993) by Martin Williams, terracotta mural on the south wall of platform 1 in Woolwich Arsenal railway station.
https://uploads.disquscdn.c...