Fares To Rise By More Than Inflation For Next Ten Years

TfL has set out its ten year business plan – we’ve had a look and put together this round-up of what we can expect from London’s transport in the future.

The focus is on investment and upgrade, and it’s being partly paid for from fares. Don’t look for fare freezes or cuts: over the next ten years, TfL is basing its plans on annual fare rises of inflation (RPI) plus 1%.

There’s an emphasis on improving London’s road network with a ten year plan, doubling planned spending from £1.9bn to £3.8bn. This video clip features Peter Hendy, TfL’s Commissioner, explaining that roads haven’t had serious investment in some time (which the state of Hammersmith flyover, and other flyovers, attest to) and talking about modernising traffic signals to reduce congestion. The same clip has Assembly Member Val Shawcross expressing concern that TfL is going the wrong way, and should be encouraging people out of cars and onto public transport.

As well as the Northern Line (by 2014) and sub-surface lines (by 2018) upgrades, there are reminders of these congestion relief schemes for tube stations:

  • The northern ticket hall at Victoria will open in 2016 and the whole scheme will be finished by 2018
  • The new ticket hall at Tottenham Court Road will open in 2016
  • Bond Street’s new ticket hall, entrance and interchange will be in use by 2017
  • At Bank, a new entrance for the Waterloo and City line will open in 2015. Wider platforms on the Northern line and step-free access will be ready by 2021.

There’s to be no Tramlink extension to Crystal Palace yet (though funding discussions are under way), but frequency will increase between Croydon and Wimbledon with four new trams and double-tracking key sections. But we’ll be able to use contactless debit and credit cards to pay for bus journeys before the month is out, and on the rest of the network by the end of next year. Overground trains will also become longer and more frequent, in recognition of the network’s popularity. And, amusingly, aviation merits one sentence.

95% of bus stops should be fully accessible by 2016 and the plan is to continue making the city’s streets more accessible and attractive by taking out clutter and adding more signage. Cyclists will lament the lack of Dutch-style cycling plans and will doubtless already know about the current junctions review and future plans for cycle routes (by the way, have your say on CS5 until 11 January).

If you want to read the full document, it’s available on TfL’s website.

Photo by Anatoleya from the Londonist Flickr pool

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  • http://londonist.com/ Dean Nicholas

    A good round-up of what we can expect over the coming years, much of it encouraging, though the headline is a bit… dare I say, Evening Standard-ish?

  • http://twitter.com/Cogbat Paul Corfield

    It is not really correct to say that there is a decade of fare increases. The RPI+1% assumption lasts until 2014/5 only in line with the current funding settlement with government. Page 48 of the draft plan makes this very clear. Of course the RPI+1% “deal” was set by the Coalition government and they face re-election in 2015. The reality is that no one knows what the fares increase assumption will be beyond 2015 even if you set aside that the Mayor can decide to have whatever increase he feels like having.

    • http://londonist.com/ Rachel Holdsworth

      That’s true, but TfL are basing their business plan on having the funds brought in from fare increases of RPI+1%. If that doesn’t happen they’ll need to either find funds from somewhere else – and given the economy’s stubborn refusal to perk up, it’s doubtful even a change of government in 2015 will increase the central grant – or some of the projects listed in today’s document would have to be cut. It’s a nuance that a headline can’t really pick up on, but it’s the definite way the wind is blowing.

  • http://twitter.com/andybrice Andy Brice

    I’d love Dutch-style cycling infrastructure in London, but I supposed it’s just not feasible in a city that wasn’t designed with bicycles in mind.

  • londona729

    It’s so unfair that bus users- who tend to be less well off than rail/tube users- are subsidising the tube. Bus fares rise despite the fact the bus subsidy is planned to remain the same till 2015!