Crossrail, As It May Appear On The Tube Map

crossrail_map.jpg
Detail of Tube map, now with added Crossrail

Seven years (and then some) before passengers will even get to board a train, Crossrail has already marked out its place on the Tube map.

On this connections map. the cross-London beast bores through the centre of town with the double-gauge line favoured by the Overground, DLR, and National Rail. Fans of tube map neatness won’t be impressed at some of the interchanges it provides, particularly at Liverpool Street, which has now been yoked with Moorgate in a most unsightly manner. Similarly, Farringdon has demonstrated its new importance by muscling in on Barbican’s turf. Canary Wharf has turned into three unconnected globules, while the Crossrail stations at Bond Street and Tottenham Court Road are listed as separate, albeit linked to, their Tube brethren. Of the central London stations, only Whitechapel and Custom House are graphically linked in with the existing network.

The map is likely to undergo revision before passenger service begins in 2018, but this at least gives a flavour of how it might look.

See the designs for the central London stations

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  • http://undefined Dan

    What do you mean by “double-gauge”? Is this a reference to the line style on the map, or to the physical construction of the track? Thanks.

    • DeanN

      Just on the map itself (Crossrail is represented by two parallel lines, rather than the one used for Tube services).

  • http://jonnelledge.wordpress.com Jonn

    Romford on the tube map. I never thought I’d see the day.

    That is one ugly map, though. Gonna need some substantial redrafting.

  • guest

    “Full map” URL is 404′ing.

  • guest

    “Full map” URL is 404′ing.

  • Guest

    Awful presentation! Tube map design seems to be going down hill. Firstly they shouldn’t show the links to Barbican and Moorgate. Second they need to get rid of the disabled symbols* so we can cut down on circles. Third, stop paying attention to geography, why does the Abbey Wood branch cross over the DLR’s Woolwich branch? It can do as a straight line from there on down across the river without anymore curves. Fourth, as for BS and TCR, simply cut diagonally down, lie it below the central then swoop up again at TCR so we don’t need a messy two-circle icon. I hope in 2017 they have learnt to keep maps simple, neat, easy to understand and artistic.

    * = They don’t indicate if there is level access from platform or train so disabled people use the disabled map – just make that available as a pocket map at tube stations for them and we can eliminate the disabled circles from the main map.

  • Guest

    Awful presentation! Tube map design seems to be going down hill. Firstly they shouldn’t show the links to Barbican and Moorgate. Second they need to get rid of the disabled symbols* so we can cut down on circles. Third, stop paying attention to geography, why does the Abbey Wood branch cross over the DLR’s Woolwich branch? It can do as a straight line from there on down across the river without anymore curves. Fourth, as for BS and TCR, simply cut diagonally down, lie it below the central then swoop up again at TCR so we don’t need a messy two-circle icon. I hope in 2017 they have learnt to keep maps simple, neat, easy to understand and artistic.

    * = They don’t indicate if there is level access from platform or train so disabled people use the disabled map – just make that available as a pocket map at tube stations for them and we can eliminate the disabled circles from the main map.

    • Paulmhub-tor

      Tfl have already published the 2018 tube map, and it doesn’t look like this

    • Paulmhub-tor

      Tfl have already published the 2018 tube map, and it doesn’t look like this

  • Chris_atkins_1977

    While we’re at it, why show the Crossrail but not the Thameslink, which also goes right through Central London and lets a lot of people avoid the Tube?

    • David Richards

      Probably because Crossrail is part of TfL and Thameslink isn’t.