You Can Now Swot Up On Marble Arch's History While Walking Through The Station

You Can Now Swot Up On Marble Arch's History While Walking Through The Station
Marble Arch tube station
43 panels tell the story of John Nash's famous monument

Marble Arch station has been fitted with 43 panels, telling the history of the landmark and its surrounding area.

Stretching from the main ticket hall to the central line station's Park Lane and Hyde Park entrances, the panels tell of John Nash's monument, which was built in 1827, and originally stood at the entrance of Buckingham Palace.

The Marble Arch originally stood at the entrance to Buckingham Palace. Image: Shutterstock

Nash's original designs also envisaged a grander arch, topped with a statue of King George IV, but this was later nixed by the spendthrift William IV.

What the Marble Arch was meant to look like. Image: VAwebteam in Creative Commons

The dark history of the area's Tyburn Tree — and the 50,000 souls who were hanged there — is touched upon, with illustrations of what busy execution days looked like.

The Tyburn Tree is one of the darkest chapters in the area's history

Myths about the arch are also dispelled — including the popular belief that it once served as a police station (true, police officers DID use it, but it didn't constitute a proper station).

The panels — installed by Marble Arch London BID and TfL — are a permanent addition to the tube station. Cram a bit of history next time you're en route to Primark.

Last Updated 12 November 2019