5 Other Clothes Collections We Don't Want To See At The V&A

By Zoe Craig Last edited 27 months ago
5 Other Clothes Collections We Don't Want To See At The V&A
Margaret Thatcher: many things, but maybe not a style icon.
Following today's news that the V&A has turned down Maggie Thatcher's old dresses, we consider some other clothes collections we definitely don't want to see at the museum.

Jeremy Corbyn

In its "thanks-but-no-thanks" statement, the V&A said, "The museum is responsible for chronicling fashionable dress." Stand down, Jeremy Corbyn; we don't think we want to see your old togs either.

Nick Clegg

Ditto.

Jeans and a shirt, not what we want to see at the V&A. From The Telegraph

Martin Bell

Mr Bell, successful UNICEF Ambassador, former war reporter and independent politician. Maybe his varied career was a direct response to his decidedly uninventive wardrobe. The V&A clothing collection includes examples of 'outstanding aesthetic quality'. The 'man in the white suit' probably doesn't need to worry about preserving his myriad slightly crumpled jackets for the benefit of future generations.

Glenda Jackson

A successful woman, doing a job, representing a constituency in parliament. Were we interested in what she was wearing? Did it make her better or worse at being an MP? Of course, as Britain's first female prime minister, Thatcher remains of historical interest in terms of this country's socio-political history. But as a clothes horse, not so much. Kudos to the ever-brilliant V&A for recognising there's no intrinsic value to a collection of shirts simply because they'd been worn by someone with two X chromosomes.

Another outfit that shouldn't be worrying V&A's crack team of curators.

Barbara Castle

See above.
Barbara Castle, wearing a shirt-collar-bow combo that doesn't need to be in the V&A.
And one we do:

Winston Churchill

Always dapper in his bespoke Savile Row suits, down to his embroidered socks, Churchill's clothing surely fits the V&A's criteria for technical quality. And he 'invented' the onesie. Bring on the Churchill Clothes Show!
Churchill wearing a famous 'siren suit' or onesie; according to Wikipedia, invented by Churchill as an original 'leisure suit' in the 1930s.
Here are some things you DO want to see in London's museums:

Last Updated 05 November 2015

Simon M

thought the first person was Harold Shipman

MattFromLondonist

Don't knock Corbyn's dress sense. It's a little-known fact that Jermyn Street, known for its fashionable tailors, is a contraction of Jeremy Corbyn Street.