London's Character Reflected Through Artists' Visions Of Public Spaces

By Silvia Baretta Last edited 33 months ago
London's Character Reflected Through Artists' Visions Of Public Spaces

Londonist is proud media partner to London Transport Museum's Prize for Illustration 2015. We will be bringing you snapshots and stories behind the illustrations throughout the exhibition’s run.

Zara Picken, Underground Fashion
Zara Picken, Underground Fashion
Ulla Steinhauer, Future Minds
Ulla Steinhauer, Future Minds
Josue Noguera Garcia, Underground
Josue Noguera Garcia, Underground
Paul Garland, Meeting Place
Paul Garland, Meeting Place
Rose Blake, Everything Matters
Rose Blake, Everything Matters
Soonmi Jung, Elephant And Castle People
Soonmi Jung, Elephant And Castle People
Susan Brown, Under The Moon
Susan Brown, Under The Moon

With more than eight million inhabitants, London is one of the most populated cities in Europe. So the question is: with so many faces, personalities and thoughts, what's the best way to represent the city's character?

It's a tricky one, but these artists have stepped up to the challenge with their unique pieces, part of the 2015 Prize for Illustration, currently on display at London Transport Museum. This year's edition of the prize celebrates London's places and spaces, highlighting how public areas add to the character of our city and represent the people who use them.

One theme is the association between people and the tube: Zara Picken uses transport-inspired graphics to decorate the face of a fashionista while Paul Garland inserts roundels and lines in women's footwear. Particularly striking is Josue Noguera Garcia's illustration; the artist has limited himself to using the colours of the famous Underground map.

We’re delighted to be media partner to London Transport Museum and will be bringing you snapshots and stories behind the illustrations throughout the exhibition’s run.

The Prize for Illustration 2015: London Places and Spaces exhibition is at London Transport Museum, Covent Garden until 6 September 2015. Entry to the museum costs £16 or £13.50 for concessions and allows unlimited daytime access to all exhibitions and events for 12 months from date of purchase. Children go free.

Last Updated 18 August 2015