In Pictures: Remarkable Artworks From Roman London

Will Noble
By Will Noble Last edited 44 months ago
In Pictures: Remarkable Artworks From Roman London
Bacchus group from the Temple of Mithras. The sculpture is made of carrara marble and depicts Bacchus with Silenus, a satyr, maenad and a panther. This sculpture was found on the latest floor of the temple when the building was no longer used to worship Mithras. It was located at the east end of the temple, against the North wall.
Bacchus accompanied by Silenus seated upon an ass with a satyr maenad and panther © Museum of London
Sculpture of a River God, possibly a personification of the River Thames, from the Mithraeum.
Neptune or a river god © Museum of London
Left hand from a statue © Museum of London
Left hand from a statue © Museum of London
Right arm of a Roman bronze statue. The arm is broken off just below the elbow. Found in a wall to East of Seething Lane, Tower St, London
Right forearm and hand from a statue © Museum of London
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Mercury seated on a rock accompanied by a ram and tortoise © Museum of London
Sculpture of Serapis, Egyptian god of the underworld. The bust shows Serapis with a corn measure on his head. Found in the east end of the temple of Mithras discovered under Bucklersbury House, EC4,1954.
Head of Serapis © Museum of London

Marble figures of Bacchus, Neptune, Mercury and various other ancient deities feature in a new book — Roman sculpture from London and the South East.

The publication — sporting 84 pages of picture plates — also features sculptures from the Temple of Mithras, and the head of Hadrian discovered in the Thames (only three Hadrian's heads are known to exist in the world).

Not only does the book explain where in London these artefacts were discovered, it tells you where you can see them now; many are right under our noses, in institutions such as the British Museum and Museum of London.

If you fancy owning the book — aimed largely at students, but a handsome coffee table piece all the same — you'll have to excavate your pockets: it'll set you back the emperor's ransom of £120.

Roman Sculpture from London and the South East is available now from the British Academy website.

Last Updated 30 April 2015