March's Most Talked About New Art Exhibitions

Tabish Khan
By Tabish Khan Last edited 38 months ago
March's Most Talked About New Art Exhibitions ★★☆☆☆ 2

You might have heard the buzz surrounding these exhibitions — if you’re undecided about whether or not to see them, here’s our guide to which are worth it. Most are free to visit.

Copyright Hugo Wilson

Hugo Wilson at Parafin
These paintings of hunting scenes may feel reminiscent of Rubens but they lack any human involvement, giving the natural world an exaggerated savagery. Make sure you don't miss the contorted and energetic sculptures downstairs. Free, until 21 March.

Londonist Rating: ★★★★☆

Alex Katz at Timothy Taylor Gallery
A new series of 'black paintings' may sound daring but it's simply his usual portraits with the normally white background now replaced with darkness. The result is a damp squib but it has got other critics excited. Free, until 2 April.

Londonist Rating: ★☆☆☆☆

Rack 'em Up at Shapero Modern
A nostalgic look back at the YBAs with Hirst memorabilia and a pornographic movie by the Chapman Brothers. It's a nice journey down memory lane for fans, but it all feels past its prime. Free, until 27 March

Londonist Rating: ★★☆☆☆

Copyright Antony Micallef

Antony Micallef: Self at Lazarides
These fantastically layered portraits come alive and grab you. There are some clear nods to Francis Bacon and Frank Auerbach, but it's a defined style of his own and we love the energy. Free, until 19 March.

Londonist Rating: ★★★★☆

Mehdi Ghadyanloo: Perception at Howard Griffin gallery
He's been nicknamed the Banksy of Tehran, they are both street artists but the similarity ends there. Ghadyanloo's work is often surreal and owes more to Magritte than any street artist. His paintings are great, we just wish there were more of them rather than his smaller sculptural works. Free, until 2 April.

Londonist Rating: ★★★☆☆

AXA PPP Health Tech and You at Design Museum
20 new health developments but they don't feel all that innovative. Lots of wearable technology and smartphone apps feel more like small steps forward, not groundbreaking advancements. Museum entry £8.80 for adults, until 26 April.

Londonist Rating: ★★☆☆☆

Photo Tabish Khan

Sheila Hicks: Foray into Chromatic Zones at Hayward Gallery project space
The knitted explosion inside the pavilion is immersive but the wall based works never manage to hold the attention. Free, until 19 April.

Londonist Rating: ★★☆☆☆

An Abiding Standard: The Prints of Stanley Anderson at Royal Academy
Prints that capture British life in the 1920s. London features heavily whether it be paying respects at the Cenotaph or the bustle of Caledonian market. Free with exhibition ticket, £3 otherwise. Until 24 May.

Londonist Rating: ★★★☆☆

Roman Signer: Slow Movement @ The Curve, Barbican centre
A kayak is pulled along the curve at a slow reflective pace for visitors to follow. This fails to land its point about slowing life down, the videos projected on the walls are much more interesting and exciting. Free, until 31 May.

Londonist Rating: ★★☆☆☆

Unseen: The Lives of Looking by Dryden Goodwin @ The Queen's House, Greenwich
The artist explores the concept of looking through three different individuals. An interesting concept but the 95 minute video is far too plodding and failed to hold our attention. Free, until 26 July.

Londonist Rating: ★★☆☆☆

Last Updated 17 March 2015