Friday Photos: The Fourth Plinth, Trafalgar Square

Laura Reynolds
By Laura Reynolds Last edited 36 months ago
Friday Photos: The Fourth Plinth, Trafalgar Square
Marc Quinn's Alison Lapper Pregnant was the first artwork to be installed on the plinth, back in 2005. Weighins 13-tonnes, the Carrara marble torso-bust is of Alison Lapper, an artist who was born with no arms and shortened legs due to a condition called phocomelia. Photo: Wally Gobetz (2006)
Marc Quinn's Alison Lapper Pregnant was the first artwork to be installed on the plinth, back in 2005. Weighins 13-tonnes, the Carrara marble torso-bust is of Alison Lapper, an artist who was born with no arms and shortened legs due to a condition called phocomelia. Photo: Wally Gobetz (2006)
Katharina Fritsch's Hahn/Cock, AKA The Blue Cock, is probably the most infamous plinth resident to date, installed in 2013 and only removed recently to make way for the new piece. Photo: Zefrog (2013)
Katharina Fritsch's Hahn/Cock, AKA The Blue Cock, is probably the most infamous plinth resident to date, installed in 2013 and only removed recently to make way for the new piece. Photo: Zefrog (2013)
Don't feed the pigeons...or they grow gigantic and turn blue. Photo: Le monde d'aujourd'hui (2015)
Don't feed the pigeons...or they grow gigantic and turn blue. Photo: Le monde d'aujourd'hui (2015)
Powerless Structures, Fig. 101 was an installation by Scandinavian artists Elmgreen & Dragset. Contrasting with the square’s other statues which celebrate kings and military leaders, portrayed the heroism of growing up.Photo: Matt (2012)
Powerless Structures, Fig. 101 was an installation by Scandinavian artists Elmgreen & Dragset. Contrasting with the square’s other statues which celebrate kings and military leaders, portrayed the heroism of growing up.Photo: Matt (2012)
Powerless Structures, Fig. 101, by Elmgreen and Dragset. Photo: Where The Art Is (2012)
Powerless Structures, Fig. 101, by Elmgreen and Dragset. Photo: Where The Art Is (2012)
Thomas Schütte's Model for a Hotel. Photo: Tezzer57 (2007)
Thomas Schütte's Model for a Hotel. Photo: Tezzer57 (2007)
Lion lunch: One of the famous Trafalgar Square lions looks ready to eat the Blue Cock. Photo: cdb41 (2014)
Lion lunch: One of the famous Trafalgar Square lions looks ready to eat the Blue Cock. Photo: cdb41 (2014)
Antony Gormley's One & Other in 2009 allowed 2,400 participants to spend an hour each on the plinth over 100 days. This photo was taken the evening before the first participants took their place. Photo: Simon Crubellier (2009)
Antony Gormley's One & Other in 2009 allowed 2,400 participants to spend an hour each on the plinth over 100 days. This photo was taken the evening before the first participants took their place. Photo: Simon Crubellier (2009)
This artist takes to the plinth as part of Antony Gormley's One & Other projevt, Photo: Stu Noble (2009)
This artist takes to the plinth as part of Antony Gormley's One & Other projevt, Photo: Stu Noble (2009)
A giant piegon on the plinth as part of Antony Gormley' One & Other. Photo: Where The Art Is (2009)
A giant piegon on the plinth as part of Antony Gormley' One & Other. Photo: Where The Art Is (2009)
The Madame Tussauds waxwork of then-captain of the England rugby team graced the Fourth Plinth in 2007, just before the World Cup final against South Africa. Photo: Andrew Smith (2007)
The Madame Tussauds waxwork of then-captain of the England rugby team graced the Fourth Plinth in 2007, just before the World Cup final against South Africa. Photo: Andrew Smith (2007)
Nelson's Ship in a Bottle, by artist Yinka Shonibare,   contained a replica of Nelson's ship, HMS Victory. Photo: Stephanie Sadler (2012)
Nelson's Ship in a Bottle, by artist Yinka Shonibare, contained a replica of Nelson's ship, HMS Victory. Photo: Stephanie Sadler (2012)

While we await photos of the new Fourth Plinth artwork in Trafalgar Square (due to be unveiled on 5 March) we decided to take a look at the world famous square and some of the past artworks to grace its north west corner.

The plinth was originally intended to hold an equestrian statue of William IV, but this was never built, so it remained empty for 150 years.

Thanks to the following photographers for use of their photos via the Londonist Flickr pool: Andrew Smith,  cdb41, Le monde d'aujourd'hui, Matt, Simon Crubellier, Stephanie Sadler, Stu Noble, Tezzer57, Wally Gobetz, Where The Art Is (and again), Zefrog,

See also: How far can you walk from Trafalgar Square without crossing a road?

Last Updated 27 February 2015

onetimeteacher

Except that wasn't the England captain - try again...