In Pictures: The Cheesegrater And Walkie-Talkie Skyscrapers

Dean Nicholas
By Dean Nicholas Last edited 58 months ago
In Pictures: The Cheesegrater And Walkie-Talkie Skyscrapers
The view from Waterloo Bridge
The view from Waterloo Bridge
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The Cheesegrater, from the ground up
The Cheesegrater, from the ground up
Side view of the Cheesegrater. Photo by Downtime_1882
Side view of the Cheesegrater. Photo by Downtime_1882
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The back of the Cheesegrater
The back of the Cheesegrater
The Cheesegrater, reflected in the back of the Walkie-Talkie tower
The Cheesegrater, reflected in the back of the Walkie-Talkie tower
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The curvature of the Walkie-Talkie
The curvature of the Walkie-Talkie
The view from the south of the river
The view from the south of the river
Computer render of the completed towers; the Pinnacle tower in the middle is unlikely to be completed in this design.
Computer render of the completed towers; the Pinnacle tower in the middle is unlikely to be completed in this design.
Computer render of the Sky Gardens, on top of the Walkie-Talkie
Computer render of the Sky Gardens, on top of the Walkie-Talkie

The Square Mile's newest pair of skyscrapers are marking themselves out amongst the city's cluster of tall buildings, as these photographs, taken over the past couple of weeks, demonstrate.

20 Fenchurch St, dubbed by its marketing team the Walkie-Talkie for the way it flares out at the upper floors , topped out toward the end of last near. Much of the building's external form is now complete; work to construct the Sky Garden, a rooftop viewing deck which will be free to access for the public, is currently underway. The building is expected to open in spring 2014.

A little ways north, the Leadenhall Tower, aka the Cheesegrater, is approaching its full height; as of this weekend it stands at nearly 200m, with another 25m to go before it tops out, probably in June. It is also slated to open next year. There's some discussion of the technical challenges inherent in building both towers in this article at Construction Manager.

The news for the Pinnacle, or Helter-Skelter, is less promising: the building has been stalled for over a year, and there are now plans to significantly re-design the tower in a more economical fashion. The Pinnacle's problems stem from its inability to attract tenants, something also afflicting the Shard. No such problems for the new towers: both have pre-let over 50% of their space.

See also:

A tour of the Walkie-Talkie Tower

Aerial photos of the new skyscrapers

Last Updated 15 April 2013

James Guppy

The Walkie-talkie is the best of three IMO. Well worth a visit on a sunny day for a dizzy upward gaze.

MB

Love the Cheesegrater. The Walkie-talkie might be the stupidest looking building I've seen in a long time - sorry. An inverse taper? Just no. The Shard (and indeed the Cheesegrater) work in good part because despite the modern facade, there's a certain elegance with a taper - pretty universal, I think. The gardens are nice and all, but this will definitely be an eyesore on the skyline.

Philip

I heard the Pinnacle had been re nick-named the Stub

HHGeek

The Londonist Out Loud interview last summer with Peter Wynne Rees was excellent, particularly his explanation of his role (City planning officer) and why he feels residential property shouldn't be encouraged too much. The only unfortunate oversight was NQW failing to challenge his claims a) that if you build in the middle of nowhere, it won't work (Canary Wharf), and b) lots of companies moving into the City is a good sign of its popularity (no, it's a sign of companies decamping to Canary Wharf).

Thing is, there's SO many tall buildings going up in the City, it's going to render it as unpleasantly windy as Canary Wharf in places. Part of the City's charm for working is its human scale; but these buildings steal the light and the warmth at pavement level. Somewhere this old and central is always on a rolling programme of change, of course it is, but just because tall buildings are possible, it doesn't mean they should be built. Especially when transport and housing will be beyond their limits for providing the staff to work in them when finished.