Art Review: A House Of Leaves @ David Roberts Art Foundation

Tabish Khan
By Tabish Khan Last edited 65 months ago
Art Review: A House Of Leaves @ David Roberts Art Foundation
Gerhard Richter, Fuji, 1996. David Roberts Collection, London
Gerhard Richter, Fuji, 1996. David Roberts Collection, London
Bruce McLean, Pose Work for Plinths, 1971. David Roberts Collection, London
Bruce McLean, Pose Work for Plinths, 1971. David Roberts Collection, London
Louise Bourgeois, ECHO VIII, 2007. David Roberts Collection, London
Louise Bourgeois, ECHO VIII, 2007. David Roberts Collection, London
Matthew Day Jackson August 6, 1945, 2012. Courtesy the artist and David Roberts Collection, London
Matthew Day Jackson August 6, 1945, 2012. Courtesy the artist and David Roberts Collection, London
Shannon Ebner, Sculptures Involuntaires, 2006. David Roberts Collection, London
Shannon Ebner, Sculptures Involuntaires, 2006. David Roberts Collection, London

The David Roberts Arts Foundation owns an impressive collection of art totalling nearly 1,900 pieces. Now that it's moved from Fitzrovia to a new space in Camden Town it finally has a space befitting such a large collection.

Rather than merely showing off its works, the gallery has come up with a much more inventive way to inaugurate the new space. The House of Leaves exhibition is structured in time like a symphony, consisting of three movements and an epilogue. Between movements, some artworks will come, some will go and some will remain until the process ends in February.

The artworks are carefully placed within the gallery so that a few are semi-concealed. Kris Martin's humorous take on Laocoon is hard to miss but the hole in the wall filled with objects is easily overlooked, though the map available at the entrance will ensure that visitors spot them all. This presents a very enjoyable and literal interpretation of exploring a gallery and discovering new artworks.

Our favourite piece is a three-dimensional map of a bombed out London by Matthew Day Jackson. Despite being charred, the Thames and London's parks are still recognisable. The work's title is the date that Hiroshima was bombed.

Though not everything resonated with us, we admire the experimental nature of this exhibition and look forward to seeing what the following movements will bring.

A House of Leaves: First Movement is on display at the David Roberts Arts Foundation, Symes Mews off Camden High Street, NW1 7JE until 23 February. Admission is free.

The Second movement runs from 14 November to 12 January, Third movement from 16 January to 16 February and the Epilogue opens on 2o February.

Last Updated 26 September 2012