Fruit And Effing Nut Case

By london_ken Last edited 158 months ago
Fruit And Effing Nut Case
chelseasalad.jpg

It happens to almost every couple at some stage: she goes on whatever diet is in fashion, he harrumphs and tries to prove a point by eating even lardier food, and eating together at home, let alone out at a restaurant, is nigh on impossible.

Gordon F. Ramsay and his wife, Tana, are no exception. While hubby makes pizza and charges £100 for it (meal deals including a litre bottle of fizzy pop and some ice cream not available), his wife tuts and makes a salad.

Tana Ramsay's creation, the 'Chelsea Salad', was launched a week before a new television series begins, starring a certain chef who will almost certainly have the words 'foul-mouthed' prepended to his job title in perpetuity. What a coincidence! It's almost as if their PR people had deliberately timed this for maximum cross-publicity.

According to the Scotsman's report:

Like the Waldorf, the Chelsea salad is a mix of fruit and nuts as well as conventional green leaves and cheese.

It consists of apricots and pine nuts with baby gem salad leaves and dolcelatte soft cheese, tossed in a dressing of freshly squeezed orange juice and olive oil.

Apparently Tana Ramsay wanted to create a recipe that any foo' working in a department store cafe/restaurant could make. Using words that are suspiciously similar to Mrs Londonist, she said:

I do it my way and that is very different to [Gordon's]. I would never, never negotiate one of his recipes.

(If you're struggling with your husband's recipes, Mrs Ramsay, we recommend Nigel Slater whose food writing, for us, is at a level way beyond anyone else. Simply sublime.)

Having successfully run the Nike 10k, the resolutely salad-dodging Londonist is on a lard diet right now, so we're not going to bother falling for the publicity (apart from writing a story about it, of course). If you fancy trying this unremarkable sounding dish, though, you can get it at the second-floor restaurant of Peter Jones in Sloane Square and pay £7.95 for the privilege. Let us know what you think if you do.

Last Updated 21 October 2005