24 April 2017 | 8 °C

In Pictures: London's Lost Theatres

In Pictures: London's Lost Theatres

London is littered with lost theatres: stunning architectural delights with dramatic pasts, that have been bombed, demolished, or simply turned into shops, bingo halls and cinemas.

Here are a few of our favourites.

The Alhambra, Leicester Square, started life in 1854. The theatre was demolished in 1936 to make way for the Odeon Leicester Square.
Source Londonist
St James's Theatre
Source Londonist
Site of the original St James Theatre
Source Londonist
The Alhambra Theatre programme
Source Vam
The Alhambra, Leicester Square.
Source Vam
Canterbury Hall
Source Vam
Canterbury Hall programme
Source Vam
One of the most famous theatre fires in London’s history occurred in 1882 at The Alhambra, Leicester Square.
Source London Fire
The Alhambra, Leicester Square.
Source London Fire
Inside The Alhambra, Leicester Square
Source British History
Canterbury Music Hall, Westminster Bridge Road. It was closed in 1942 by German bomb damage. It never re-opened and the wrecked auditorium was demolished in 1955 and became a car park
Source Cinematreasures
St James's Theatre was demolished in 1957. It was a favourite of Oscar Wilde
Source Fineartamerica
The Gaiety Theatre, Aldwych. The building suffered extensive bomb damage during air raids and stood empty until it was demolished in 1956
Source Baylor
The Gaiety Theatre, Aldwych. It was known for music hall and then for musical burlesque, pantomime and operetta performances
Source Baylor
The Chiswick Empire was in operation between 1912 and 1959.
Source Oldstratforduponavon
The Chiswick Empire. The building was demolished a month after Liberace played there on 29 June 1959.
Source Oldstratforduponavon
The Catford Hippodrome. It became the Eros Cinema which was demolished in 1960.
Source Oldstratforduponavon
The Gaiety Theatre
Source Oldstratforduponavon
The Eygptian Hall, Piccadilly. The hall was pulled down in 1905
Source
A woodcutting of The Egyptian Hall, Piccadilly in 1826.
Source Londonist
The first Royal Pavilion Theatre in Whitechapel, 1856.
Source Spitalfieldslife
The rebuilt Pavilion, 1858.
Source Spitalfieldslife
The Whitechapel Pavilion as a Yiddish theatre in the 1930s.
Source Spitalfieldslife
Pavilion Theatre facade on Whitechapel Road, 1961.
Source Spitalfieldslife
The Pantheon theatre, Oxford Street.
Source British History
The site of The Pantheon, Oxford Street.
Source Jeremai

Last Updated 22 March 2017