Gore And Gold: March's Most Talked About Art Exhibitions

Tabish Khan
By Tabish Khan Last edited 33 months ago
Gore And Gold: March's Most Talked About Art Exhibitions

What's the verdict on these new exhibitions? We’ve picked a mixture of ones that are grabbing the headlines and others we think are worth a look. All are free to visit.

A smoke bomb performance by Filippo Minelli in the Somerset House courtyard. Photo Tabish Khan

Venturing Beyond at Somerset House
Utopian graffiti sounds like a great topic for an exhibition, and it features the work of Shepard Fairey and the coloured smoke works of Filippo Minelli. However, the three rooms for the show feel inadequate and this feels more like a taster, rather than the thorough exploration we were expecting. Free, until 2 May

Londonist Rating:

★★☆☆☆

In Search Of Lost Time & Sand in My Eyes at Brunei Gallery
Two excellent exhibitions within this gallery at SOAS that many people won't know about. Upstairs is photography documenting daily life in Sudan. Downstairs is a contemporary art exhibition exploring the influence of religion and Western culture in the Middle East. And if the weather's nice, check out the roof garden. Free, until 19 March

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

Ikon at Plinth, at 44 Great Russell Street
Art, furniture and design take over this fantastic pop up space in a house directly across from The British Museum. Nearly everything is for sale and there are lots of affordable works. Free, until 19 March

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

The gory paintings of Ken Currie. Photo courtesy Flowers.

Ken Currie: Tragic Forms at Flowers East
War injuries, men vomiting, gutted rays. These delightfully gory paintings are the works of Ken Currie. They make for fantastic, if not easy, viewing. Free, until 9 April

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

Harmony Korine at Gagosian, Davies Street
The film director behind movies such as Kids and Spring Breakers turns his hand to art. What's surprising is that given his controversial reputation, these works are remarkably boring. Bright but bland. Free, until 24 March

Londonist Rating:

★☆☆☆☆

Mark Wallinger at Hauser & Wirth
A massive exhibition across both gallery spaces covering a wide range of issues. Giant Rorschach test style paintings are the size and span of the artist's body, while a giant mirrored version of the New Scotland Yard sign revolves and questions the nature of surveillance. The other works here are less powerful, but it's great to see dynamic new work from an established artist. Free, until 7 May

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

Plenty of gold in the Pomodoro exhibition. Photo courtesy Tornabuoni Art

Arnaldo Pomodoro at Tornabuoni Art
Gold is everywhere in this sculpture exhibition across two floors. Polished surfaces juxtaposed with two sides of the work pulling apart to reveal the ragged interiors. It's a delicately beautiful show. Free, until 16 April

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

Dean Melbourne: This Myth at Gallery 8
Coates and Scarry offer their best London exhibition yet. These surreal and expressive paintings, covering mythical themes, are brilliant. It's a rare treat to see good figurative contemporary painters, and Melbourne delivers. Free, until 12 March

Londonist Rating:

★★★★☆

Avedon Warhol at Gagosian, Britannia Street
Two heavy hitters meet in this exhibition. Richard Avedon photographed the famous, but once the celebrity appeal is removed it's clear that Avedon was an average photographer. Warhol was a genius as a conceptualist, but when many of his works are hung together they end up detracting from each other. Free, until 23 April

Londonist Rating:

★★☆☆☆

Alberto Giacometti at Luxembourg & Dayan
Early sculptures from between 1925-1934 before his signature evolved. It may not be his best work but it offers a fascinating look into how his work evolved. Free, until 9 April

Londonist Rating:

★★★☆☆

Last Updated 29 March 2016