Plans For Vauxhall Gyratory Segregated Cycle Lanes Released

Picture from TfL consultation site

Picture from TfL consultation site

Plans to introduce segregated cycle routes on the Vauxhall gyratory have been released by Transport for London (TfL) for consultation.

The current gyratory has been described as the ‘nastiest’ in London, and 52 year old cyclist Tafsir Butt was killed in a collision with a lorry in June this year. But if the plans are agreed, it will be replaced by a separated two-way track between Pimlico and Kennington Oval which will take cyclists safely through the gyratory and over Vauxhall Bridge. You can see the map here.

Pedestrians will also get extra space – around one square kilometre of new footway is included in the plans. The segregated track will be part of Cycle Superhighway 5 between New Cross and Belgrave Square and linking to existing ‘Quietway’ cycle routes. TfL say this means cyclists will be able to travel around large parts of Westminster, the West End and central London entirely on traffic-free or low-traffic routes. Cyclists using the new segregated route would also be able to avoid passing through the Victoria gyratory. London mayor Boris Johnson said:

“In my Cycling Vision I promised that the worst and most dangerous junctions would be made safe for cyclists. Vauxhall is the first. In the same week London hosted the Tour de France, I am perhaps even more excited by this scheme, which will help ordinary cyclists every day for years to come.”

TfL’s plans are the latest in a group of improvements to cycling conditions in the capital. Plans for a central London grid of Quietways were released last year, though these have been criticised for potentially putting cyclists at odds with pedestrians on side roads. Construction of the first Quietways is due to start in September this year.

The Vauxhall gyratory consultation will be open until Sunday 14 September and work could begin in winter 2014. Visit TfL’s consultation page to have your say on the plans.

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  • andybrice

    I don’t have any strong opinions regarding the whole integrated versus segregated cycle lanes debate. Either is fine with me, as long as they interact properly with every junction they pass through. There’s no point building cycle lanes that are such a hassle to enter and exit that people would rather not use them.