10 December 2016 | 11 °C

Opening Tomorrow: Bridge At Museum Of London Docklands

By Londonist Last edited 30 months ago
Opening Tomorrow: Bridge At Museum Of London Docklands
Hybrid Image: Looking north across London Bridge, 1920s, by George Davison Reid. Today the Museum of London Docklands released 16 hybrid photographs showing ‘then and now’ views of London and its most iconic bridges across the ages. The 16 ghostly images, which juxtapose historic views with their present day perspective, have been created using photographs showcased in Museum of London Docklands’ new art exhibition Bridge, opening on Friday 27 June.
George Davison Reid (1871–1933) Looking north across London Bridge ) c. 1920s Taken from inside on the 5th floor of No1 London Bridge. © George Davison Reid/Museum of London
Hybrid Image: Lower pool with Tower Bridge under construction, late 19th century. Today the Museum of London Docklands released 16 hybrid photographs showing ‘then and now’ views of London and its most iconic bridges across the ages. The 16 ghostly images, which juxtapose historic views with their present day perspective, have been created using photographs showcased in Museum of London Docklands’ new art exhibition Bridge, opening on Friday 27 June.
Unknown photographer Lower Pool, with Tower Bridge under constructionGlass lantern slide c. late 19th century © Museum of London
Hybrid Image: Charing Cross Railway Bridge, late 19th century. Today the Museum of London Docklands released 16 hybrid photographs showing ‘then and now’ views of London and its most iconic bridges across the ages. The 16 ghostly images, which juxtapose historic views with their present day perspective, have been created using photographs showcased in Museum of London Docklands’ new art exhibition Bridge, opening on Friday 27 June.
Unknown photographer Charing Cross Railway Bridge Glass lantern slide c. late 19th century Taken from South Bank.© Museum of London
Hybrid Image: A windy evening on London Bridge, 1937, by Henry Turner. Today the Museum of London Docklands released 16 hybrid photographs showing ‘then and now’ views of London and its most iconic bridges across the ages. The 16 ghostly images, which juxtapose historic views with their present day perspective, have been created using photographs showcased in Museum of London Docklands’ new art exhibition Bridge, opening on Friday 27 June.
Henry Turner (active 1930s) A Windy Evening on London Bridge c. 1937 From Wordsworth to T S Eliot, the crowds streaming across London Bridge have always attracted attention. Turner was a photographer and General Secretary of the Empire Press Union (later Commonwealth Press Union). He made this image for E Arnot Robertson's book Thames Portrait (1937). Note the lack of bowler hats to the left of the image! © Henry Turner/Museum of London
Hybrid Image: Richmond Bridge, 1930, by Albert Gravely Linney. Today the Museum of London Docklands released 16 hybrid photographs showing ‘then and now’ views of London and its most iconic bridges across the ages. The 16 ghostly images, which juxtapose historic views with their present day perspective, have been created using photographs showcased in Museum of London Docklands’ new art exhibition Bridge, opening on Friday 27 June.
Albert Gravely Linney Richmond Bridge c. 1930 Taken from the North side of the river. © Albert Gravely Linney/Museum of London
Hybrid Image: Tower Bridge, 1903-10, by Christina Broom. Today the Museum of London Docklands released 16 hybrid photographs showing ‘then and now’ views of London and its most iconic bridges across the ages. The 16 ghostly images, which juxtapose historic views with their present day perspective, have been created using photographs showcased in Museum of London Docklands’ new art exhibition Bridge, opening on Friday 27 June.
Christina Broom (1863–1939) Tower Bridge c. 1903–10 Broom was a professional photographer who produced a series of London street views for sale as postcards. She later photographed the activities of the suffrage movement in London and was one of the earliest female press photographers. Taken from Shad Thames Jetty.© Christina Broom/Museum of London

Excitement is brewing in Londonist Towers. Tonight we're off to the opening party of Museum of London Dockland’s largest art exhibition to date, Bridge, to which we are proud media partner.

From tomorrow Bridge is open to the public. The exhibition is a multimedia celebration of the river crossings linking London’s north to its south (and vice versa, naturally). Photographs, panoramas, artworks, data visualizations and film combine to depict the bridges of the Thames, past and present.

Above is a selection of our favourite hybrid photographs, recently released by Museum of London Docklands, showing 'then and now' views of London's iconic bridges. Each shows commingled eras of the bridge, its construction, demolition, footfall or simply how the view has changed. They have all been created using source photographs on display, of which many more can be seen at the exhibition.

And there's more. Take a look at the trailer below for a further taste of what’s happening. Remember, the exhibition is entirely free, so there’s no excuse not to visit.

Bridge runs at Museum of London Docklands from 27 June to 2 November 2014. Entrance is free.

Londonist is proud media partner to Bridge, #BridgeArt.

Last Updated 26 June 2014