26 August 2016 | 10 °C

London Stories Illustrated At London Transport Museum

London Stories Illustrated At London Transport Museum
First place - Monkey Band at large in Notting Hill 1927 by Gill Bradley. In 1927 An escaped Monkey Jazz band embarked on days of high jinks and mayhem at Latimer Road Metropolitan station. Jumping aboard trains one reached as far as Rugby before capture.
First place - Monkey Band at large in Notting Hill 1927 by Gill Bradley. In 1927 An escaped Monkey Jazz band embarked on days of high jinks and mayhem at Latimer Road Metropolitan station. Jumping aboard trains one reached as far as Rugby before capture.
Second place – Nicholas Stevenson, Frost Fair. The River Thames froze solid 24 times between 1408 and 1814. Sometimes it lasted long enough to hold a fair on the ice, complete with rides, beers, roast ox, and even an Elephant!
Second place – Nicholas Stevenson, Frost Fair. The River Thames froze solid 24 times between 1408 and 1814. Sometimes it lasted long enough to hold a fair on the ice, complete with rides, beers, roast ox, and even an Elephant!
Third place – Eric Chow, The Lady Bridge. "The Waterloo Bridge was reconstructed mostly by women during the wars in 1945, while men were doing national service, and so has another name – The Lady Bridge."
Third place – Eric Chow, The Lady Bridge. "The Waterloo Bridge was reconstructed mostly by women during the wars in 1945, while men were doing national service, and so has another name – The Lady Bridge."
Going to Work by Fabio Corazza. Illustration based on the urban legend that HM the Queen has her own private secret tube station.
Going to Work by Fabio Corazza. Illustration based on the urban legend that HM the Queen has her own private secret tube station.
The 1831 London Bridge Banquet by Clair Rossiter. On 1 August 1831, there was a banquet to celebrate the opening of the new London Bridge. The feast took place on the bridge itself and was provided by Mr Leech of the London Coffeehouse.
The 1831 London Bridge Banquet by Clair Rossiter. On 1 August 1831, there was a banquet to celebrate the opening of the new London Bridge. The feast took place on the bridge itself and was provided by Mr Leech of the London Coffeehouse.
Gog and Magog by Helen Lord. The giants Gog and Magog nestle below a version of London in which myth and folklore mingle with modern life and tradition.
Gog and Magog by Helen Lord. The giants Gog and Magog nestle below a version of London in which myth and folklore mingle with modern life and tradition.
There's a Whale in the Thames! by Jessie Ford. The day the whale appeared in the Thames was a moment of great public intrigue. Seeing a whale in the Thames is not something you see every day and for a moment, London was captivated.
There's a Whale in the Thames! by Jessie Ford. The day the whale appeared in the Thames was a moment of great public intrigue. Seeing a whale in the Thames is not something you see every day and for a moment, London was captivated.
Menagerie in the Tower by Erica Sturla. The Royal menagerie in the Tower brings a wealth of stories from its 600 year chapter in London's history. I wanted to create an exotic, chaotic and historical scene in a bright contemporary drawing.
Menagerie in the Tower by Erica Sturla. The Royal menagerie in the Tower brings a wealth of stories from its 600 year chapter in London's history. I wanted to create an exotic, chaotic and historical scene in a bright contemporary drawing.
No Great Expectations of Finding a Seat by Dominic McKenzie. From beggars to bankers, dreamers to winners - London stories have given us some incredible characters. Here are some of the best riding the tube. Why? They get the best lines...
No Great Expectations of Finding a Seat by Dominic McKenzie. From beggars to bankers, dreamers to winners - London stories have given us some incredible characters. Here are some of the best riding the tube. Why? They get the best lines...
River Pageant 2012 by Sue Prince. Eye witness painting of the Royal Jubilee Thames River Pageant, celebrating the freedom and diversity of our society.
River Pageant 2012 by Sue Prince. Eye witness painting of the Royal Jubilee Thames River Pageant, celebrating the freedom and diversity of our society.
Something Good by Richard Williams. This image came to me fully realised. A story forming around the image. The 'spiv' became a Wide Boy, the Wide Boy became Del Boy and I found myself with not just one London story but many.
Something Good by Richard Williams. This image came to me fully realised. A story forming around the image. The 'spiv' became a Wide Boy, the Wide Boy became Del Boy and I found myself with not just one London story but many.
The Phantom Bus no.7 by Miguel Lima. With this illustration I aimed to create my own version of the no.7 bus story, the so-called ‘phantom bus’ that runs trough Cambridge Gardens at 1:15am. It includes a timetable showing the haunted hour.
The Phantom Bus no.7 by Miguel Lima. With this illustration I aimed to create my own version of the no.7 bus story, the so-called ‘phantom bus’ that runs trough Cambridge Gardens at 1:15am. It includes a timetable showing the haunted hour.

The fifty best entries to the fourth Serco Prize for Illustration go on show at London Transport Museum today - and they're fantastic. Last time we were at the museum it was for the wonderful Poster 150 exhibition and many of these new artworks and designs wouldn't look out of place next to some of the finest from the archive.

There are many outstanding images, bringing diverse London stories to illustrated life in imaginative, creative and clever ways. The Tower of London is a popular source of inspiration with its ravens and menagerie beasts, and ghost buses and trains are also inevitably popular. We were pleased to see the Thames Whale remembered, the Queen's secret tube station exposed and Gog and Magog nestling beneath the city, but it was the escaped monkey jazz band on the loose in Notting Hill that was the judges' first choice.

Tonight there's a Late at the museum to celebrate the opening of London Stories. Take in the exhibition after hours and enjoy London music, adult storytelling aboard heritage vehicles, the chance to illustrate your own London story, balloon sculptures, crafty things, a quiz and 2-4-1 Night Bus Cocktails. Tickets £10, £8 concessions, 6.45-10pm.

London Stories opens today at London Transport Museum until 16 April. Entry to the Museum is £15/£11.50 with unlimited return visits within one year. Under 16s go free. Open 10am-6pm (Fridays 11am-6pm).

Last Updated 16 July 2015

Lindsey

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Alexandra Westcott

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