The Births And Deaths Of English Monarchs…Mapped

This article was originally published on 29 May 2012 but has been updated with direct heirs to the throne following the royal birth.

We’re total nerds at Londonist. Three years ago, during a bout of all-night insomnia, we decided to map where every king and queen of England since the Conquest was born and died. Why? Who knows. But we finally got a vague excuse to publish the map with the 2012 Diamond Jubilee.

Here it is. Green dotted pins show a place of birth; red pins show a place of death; yellow pins show the birthplaces of the three individuals in direct line to the throne.


View Monarchs of England in a larger map

As can be seen from a casual glance, the royal family spawned and expired all over northern Europe. Here are a few observations about monarchical goings-on in London.

  • The first monarch born in London was Edward I, who first saw light in Westminster Palace in 1239.
  • The first monarch to die in London was Henry III, who passed away in Westminster Palace in 1272.
  • The last monarch to die in London was Edward VII, who breathed his last in Buckingham Palace in 1910. His final words: “I am very glad,” after hearing that his horse had won at Kempton Park.
  • The last monarch to be born in London was Elizabeth II, who’s a Mayfair girl. Her birthplace on Bruton Street is marked with a plaque.
  • The most regal births in one place is claimed by St James’ Palace, with five (Charles II, James II, Mary II, Anne, George IV). It was also the last haunt of Mary I.
  • The most fatal building for monarchs is Kensington Palace, where four kings and queens met their ends (George II, William III, Mary II, Anne). In addition, Victoria was born here.
  • 12 monarchs were born in Westminster.

Notes for pedants

  • We’re aware that the realms these people controlled varied in name and geography over the centuries, but we’re using ‘England’ as a sensible if somewhat inaccurate shorthand. Sorry if that irks anyone.
  • We didn’t go back before the Norman Conquest as territories get even murkier, and places of birth and death are not always known. Check out Kingston-on-Thames, though, for right-royal connections before the Plantagenets took hold.
  • We left off Jane Grey as her title is disputed. She was born in Leicestershire and died (famously) at the Tower of London.
  • No, we’re not mapping all the marriages as well.

 

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  • http://kerryonshakespeare.wordpress.com/ Kerry

    Interesting that none died outside Western Europe – I expected more deaths in war.

    I’d be keen to see one mapping consorts as well, I bet that one is much more widely spread!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=612889045 Jonathan Wadman

    This is an interesting if grisly book on the subject: 
    http://www.absonbooks.co.uk/titles/death-of-kings.htm

  • Guest

    Excellent work!

  • Barry Walsh

    Fascinating, thanks,

  • Barry

    Can you do the same for prime ministers please?

    • MattFromLondonist

      Good idea! It’ll be published tomorrow.

  • AJ

    Could you please update Prince George’s information, I don’t think he is a unnamed baby any more.

    • MattFromLondonist

      Ha, good point. Tis done.