Envisioning The Universe: Are Space Images Art?

This is a sponsored post on behalf of the National Maritime Museum. 

At the beginning of June, the National Maritime Museum opened its awe-inspiring Visions of the Universe exhibition. The museum’s first big astronomy venture, Visions of the Universe showcases images of distant galaxies and looming planets, bringing together breathtaking astronomical perspectives into one exhibition space. Now, for one day only, visitors will be able to join an international panel to discuss what impact a showcase of such magnitude has on shaping our relationship with space.

On Sunday 30 June, a stellar panel of artists, critics and astronomers will come together for a day of workshops and talks to discuss the impact that astrophotographic images have on us, as well as tackle the question of whether photographic images of space – while undeniable in their beauty – are actually art. Speaking at Envisioning the Universe are:

  • Marek Kukula, curator of the exhibition
  • Jonathan Jones, art writer for The Guardian
  • Elizabeth Kessler, author of Picturing the Cosmos: Hubble Space Telescope Images and the Astronomical Sublime’
  • Elizabeth Price, winner of the Turner Prize 2012

Join in the debate before enjoying a private after-hours view of the spectacular exhibition alongside the speakers. And because it is unthinkable to voyage into space on an empty stomach, the ticket price also includes lunch.

Envisioning the Universe takes place on Sunday 30 June 12-6pm at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, tickets cost £25 or £22 for members and can be booked via the website. Visions of the Universe runs at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich from 7 June till 15 September 2013. A series of events for families and adults supports the exhibition. See the Londonist review of the Visions of the Universe exhibition. 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,