Week In Geek: 22-28 October 2012

London events for people with curious minds.

Week in Geek goes spooky, with the London Ghost Conference (see Saturday). Image by Sarah Sparks.

Monday 22 October

VIDEO GAMES: Art work inspired by famous video games goes on show at City Hall as part of the London Games Festival. Runs until 26 October. Free, just turn up but be ready for security checks, 9am-6pm

TIMEKEEPING: We’ve all heard of a bodyclock, but how does your brain know what time of day it is? Debra Skeen offers her insights at tonight’s Cafe Scientifique at the Royal Society. Free, just turn up, 6.30pm

RANDOMNESS: Chris French hosts an evening at Goldsmiths College discussing how humans often perceive patterns in essentially random information, and how this might underlie belief in the paranormal. £2, just turn up, 7pm

Tuesday 23 October

TUBE MAP: A film screening at London Transport Museum looks at the past 12 years of Tube map covers, specially commissioned from top artists. £10, 6.30pm

Wednesday 24 October

EYES: An ageing society means a less visually able society…or will new interventions make partial sight a thing of the past? William Ayliffe gives a Gresham lecture on his vision for vision, at the Museum of London. Free, just turn up, 6pm

NOURISHMENT: Five speakers gather at Wellcome Collection to offer their interpretation of the word ‘nourishment‘. Given that the guests include a cloud expert and a professor of physiology, you can be assured of a varied evening. Free, just turn up, 7.30pm

BRIGHT CLUB: The regular event that sees academics, researchers and comedians share a stage returns to the Bloomsbury Theatre, compered by Andrew O’Neill. £8, 7.30pm

Thursday 25 October

FEAR: In the run up to Hallowe’en, Imperial College puts on an evening devoted to the science of fear — from how our hearts cope with stress to zombie apocalypses. Free, just turn up if you dare, 6-9pm

SENSES OF SPACE: In space, no one can hear you scream. Not according to Imperial College, whose lecture tonight looks at ways of perceiving the cosmos using all five senses. Smell the Horsehead Nebula in the Huxley Building tonight. Free, but prebook, 6.30pm

LUNACY: That the moon can affect people’s moods and behaviours is an ancient belief, but is there the slightest shred of evidence to back up the stories? A talk at the Fortean Society, upstairs at The Bell in Spitalfields, probes. £3, 8pm

Friday 26 October

GORY CAKES: St Bartholomews Pathology Museum in Smithfield holds a three-day fest of gory cakes shaped like human body parts. A series of lectures will run alongside. More on this in another post, soon. Runs till 28 October. Free, just turn up, 11am-6pm

PSYCHIC RESEARCH: Between the two world wars, reputable physicists worked with the likes of Harry Price to investigate the paranormal. A lunchtime talk at the Royal Society picks through the archive. Free, just turn up, 1pm

Saturday 27 October

TICK-TOCK: The clocks go back this weekend. To mark the twice-yearly inconvenience, the Foundling Museum holds a weekend of horological eventage, with talks, family workshops and clock handling sessions. Continues tomorrow. Free, just turn up, 10am-4pm

SPOOKS: The Fortean Society of London is back, with a one-day Ghost Conference at the Bishopsgate Institute, looking with an open yet critical mind at some of the capital’s alleged hauntings. £20, 10.30am-6pm

CAMPING: The Natural History Museum’s new campsite (nothing to do with Occupy) opens, promising nature-inspired activities and events for all the family. Continues until 2 November. Free, just turn up, 11am-4.30pm

Sunday 28 October

KINETIC ART: “Spinning, whirling, and pendulous sound installations,” are the order of the day at Village Underground, Shoreditch, where four artists who mix objects, sound and vision come together at a special performance organised by Kinetica. Continues tomorrow. £14/£14, 3pm/7pm

 Did we miss anything? Let us know in the comments below, or tip us off about future events by emailing matt@londonist.com

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