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London Literary Locations: Jane Austen

Rachel Holdsworth
By Rachel Holdsworth Last edited 65 months ago
London Literary Locations: Jane Austen
23 Hans Place: Jane Austen stayed a house on this site off Sloane Street with her brother Henry in 1814-15.
23 Hans Place: Jane Austen stayed a house on this site off Sloane Street with her brother Henry in 1814-15.
Gracechurch Street: "Mr Darcy may have heard of a place called Gracechurch Street, but he would hardly think a month's ablution enough to cleanse him from its impurities" (Pride and Prejudice, Ch. 25). Mr and Mrs Gardiner's home is in Gracechurch Street, not Cheapside as Caroline Bingley bitches.
Gracechurch Street: "Mr Darcy may have heard of a place called Gracechurch Street, but he would hardly think a month's ablution enough to cleanse him from its impurities" (Pride and Prejudice, Ch. 25). Mr and Mrs Gardiner's home is in Gracechurch Street, not Cheapside as Caroline Bingley bitches.
St Clement's church: "We were married, you know, at St Clement's, because Wickham's lodgings were in that parish." (Pride and Prejudice, Ch 51). This is St Clement's Eastcheap, as opposed to St Clement Danes on the Strand - a more probable setting for a "patched-up business" (thank you Lady Catherine) and also round the corner from Lydia's aunt and uncle's house.
St Clement's church: "We were married, you know, at St Clement's, because Wickham's lodgings were in that parish." (Pride and Prejudice, Ch 51). This is St Clement's Eastcheap, as opposed to St Clement Danes on the Strand - a more probable setting for a "patched-up business" (thank you Lady Catherine) and also round the corner from Lydia's aunt and uncle's house.
Wimpole Street: "...it was with infinite concern the newspaper had to announce to the world, a matrimonial fracas in the family of Mr R of Wimpole Street" (Mansfield Park, Ch 25). Maria Rushworth elopes with Henry Crawford from her husband's house.
Wimpole Street: "...it was with infinite concern the newspaper had to announce to the world, a matrimonial fracas in the family of Mr R of Wimpole Street" (Mansfield Park, Ch 25). Maria Rushworth elopes with Henry Crawford from her husband's house.
Grosvenor Street: "She then read the first sentence aloud, which comprised the information of their having just resolved to follow their brother to town directly, and of meaning to dine the next day in Grosvenor Street, where Mr Hurst had a house" (Pride and Prejudice, Ch 21). Charles and Caroline Bingley stay with their sister and her husband.
Grosvenor Street: "She then read the first sentence aloud, which comprised the information of their having just resolved to follow their brother to town directly, and of meaning to dine the next day in Grosvenor Street, where Mr Hurst had a house" (Pride and Prejudice, Ch 21). Charles and Caroline Bingley stay with their sister and her husband.
Berkeley Street: "Never had Marianne been so unwilling to dance in her life, as she was that evening, and never so much fatigued by the exercise. She complained of it as they returned to Berkeley Street" (Sense and Sensibility, Vol 2 Ch 5). Elinor and Marianne stay with Mrs Jennings in town.
Berkeley Street: "Never had Marianne been so unwilling to dance in her life, as she was that evening, and never so much fatigued by the exercise. She complained of it as they returned to Berkeley Street" (Sense and Sensibility, Vol 2 Ch 5). Elinor and Marianne stay with Mrs Jennings in town.
Bond Street: "Lodging as I did in Bond Street, there was hardly a day in which I did not catch a glimpse of one or other of you" (Sense and Sensibility, Vol 3 Ch 8). Willoughby bemoans seeing Marianne and Elinor after his marriage / "No, my dear little modest Harriet, depend upon it the picture will not be in Bond Street till just before he mounts his horse tomorrow" (Emma, Ch 7). Emma spectacularly misinterprets Mr Elton's intentions.
Bond Street: "Lodging as I did in Bond Street, there was hardly a day in which I did not catch a glimpse of one or other of you" (Sense and Sensibility, Vol 3 Ch 8). Willoughby bemoans seeing Marianne and Elinor after his marriage / "No, my dear little modest Harriet, depend upon it the picture will not be in Bond Street till just before he mounts his horse tomorrow" (Emma, Ch 7). Emma spectacularly misinterprets Mr Elton's intentions.
Brunswick Square: "The neighbourhood of Brunswick Square is very different from almost all the rest. We are so very airy!" (Emma, Ch 12). Isabella Knightley shows off about her home; she probably wouldn't be impressed with the Brunswick Centre.
Brunswick Square: "The neighbourhood of Brunswick Square is very different from almost all the rest. We are so very airy!" (Emma, Ch 12). Isabella Knightley shows off about her home; she probably wouldn't be impressed with the Brunswick Centre.
10 Henrietta Street: Jane Austen lived in Covent Garden with her brother during summer 1813 and March 1814.
10 Henrietta Street: Jane Austen lived in Covent Garden with her brother during summer 1813 and March 1814.

Jane Austen's characters tend to live sheltered lives out in the country or taking the waters at Bath, so finding a London mention in one of her novels comes as something of  a treat. Particularly when you realise, as we have over the last few days, that most of the more salacious episodes happen in 'town': Maria Rushworth runs off with Henry Crawford from a house in Wimpole Street, Lydia and Wickham hole up in the City before Mr Darcy sniffs them out, and London is the setting for poor Marianne's discovery of what a scoundrel Willoughby truly is.

We've been out and taken some photos of the more important locations, as well as two places where Jane Austen stayed. We've also mapped all the locations we could find mentioned in the books:


View Jane Austen in a larger map
Key:
Blue - Emma
Red - Lady Susan
Green - Mansfield Park
Turquoise - Northanger Abbey
Purple - Pride and Prejudice
Green without black dot - Sanditon
Yellow - Sense and Sensibility
Red without black dot - The Watsons
Pink - Jane Austen's residences

Other Literary Locations: Mrs Dalloway, Saturday, Gods Behaving Badly, White Teeth, The Borribles. We've since amended the caption for 23 Hans Place - the house where Jane Austen stayed was destroyed and this building erected in the mid 19th century.

Last Updated 08 July 2011

Jend001

Great article thanks

Tara

finally! I am a huge Jane Austen fan and have been looking and looking for something I could see in London that ties to her. I don't have time to go out to Bath where all the tourist attractions seem to be. Thanks for this post.