26 February 2017 | 10 °C

A splash of Colour

By sizemore Last edited 121 months ago
A splash of Colour

Seen the Bravia ad with all the exploding paint? Here it is:

We always knew that clowns were terrorists.

The final ad was filmed in Glasgow, but there's an interview about filming the ad up on Film London. Turns out the exploding paint was first tested in London:

My first action was to call Film London and send a blanket email to all London boroughs to find out if any council housing was being demolished over the next few months. We needed housing stock that would be demolished because we were covering it in paint and also using explosives so it needed to be empty. Firstly we had to test the apparatus to see if it could fire the paint and what height and spread it would give. This had never been done before so throughout the research process we were learning all the time. We discovered a block in Islington that was almost empty and was up for being covered in paint. We spent two days there in March firing paint from tubes up the side of it, much to the bemusement of the locals. It didn't go as smoothly as we would have liked, but there was enough potential to continue with the testing.

Shame the final thing wasn't done here, but maybe some advertising genius can come up with a way to level Elephant & Castle while flogging iPods or something.

If you like the idea of about to be demolished buildings being covered in paint then get along to the first London solo show of British graffiti artist SheOne - James Choules:

Inspired by abstract typography and expressionism Choules will transform a historical site on the South Bank before its demolition - using bold strokes, emblems and personalised shorthand; a style that has won him acclaim for its quietly dramatic minimalism... Union Works, is a historical grade II listed building a disused factory, that also houses the last remaining bear-baiting arena dating from the 1680’s. The site has a unique energy, vast size, temporal structure and historical importance. The building will be demolished when the exhibition ends with the paintings still intact – A film documentary will be made of the destruction.

Last Updated 05 January 2007

Seb Brennan

Why, exactly, is this "historic Grade II listed building" being knocked down? I thought the point of listing was to, er, prevent historic buildings from being demolished?
All I can find out from Google is that there's planning permission for a six storey office block (naturally), but does anyone know any more? Is the bear pit going as well?